Thursday, August 12, 2010


Pressed mold bottle vase, made in July’s workshop

Thursday, August 12, 2010
Waxing Moon
Pluto Retrograde
Neptune Retrograde
Uranus Retrograde
Jupiter Retrograde
Hot, humid, cloudy

Would it please storm already?

Yesterday was quite the roller coaster.

Had a GREAT session of work on ASSUMPTION OF RIGHT — I’ve found “the” excerpt I want to use for marketing, came up with the logline and the back cover blurb, massaged the bio, came up with a few things I want to discuss with the editor that I think can be improved. I hope to have everything out by tomorrow.

i stopped by the studio to see if my other pieces were ready — only one little pinch pot was, so I retrieved that. The rest of the stuff is set to come out of the kiln today or tomorrow.

Worked in the storage unit. I figured that six boxes would take me two hours, and that would be enough in this heat. But I managed to work my way through ten boxes in about an hour and a half — a whole line, which was even better. I purged a few bags of stuff, I found some stuff to wash and give to the donation box, and I found lots of treasures, things I forgot I had, including some lovely jewelry, candles, candleholders, even egg cups. I’m a freak for egg cups — I love them, and every time I see them for sale or in a thrift shop or a tag sale, I buy them. I also found some books I’m hauling back, including my Edinburgh Street Finder, very helpful when I’m writing something set in Edinburgh and have forgotten which street is called what, or, when I know how to get somewhere, but don’t have street names, I can look it up. Ten boxes became three boxes of sorted, organized material, which is how it should be.

On the downside, there was some dry rot in a few things that needed to be thrown out, and, at one point, I got a snoutful of it. It was like having cement fill up my lungs, and I couldn’t breathe. Think I’ll be using a mask from now on. These boxes were packed in 2001.

It was such a roll I may go back tomorrow and do another set of boxes. I have between 50-80 boxes marked “MISC”, which means, when I packed up 13 years of my life in 6 days when I gave up my apartment in Manhattan, I didn’t have time to sort through it, just filled boxes. Most of the boxes in storage are really well marked with room and contents, but I hit a point where I ran out of time.

After, I went to a friend’s place to clean up and have dinner.

When I came home, I found the screen on the fire escape raised. The window was locked, so no one managed to get in, but it was disconcerting, to say the least. I wasn’t sure what to do, so I photographed it, then called the non-emergency number from the police. The desk sergeant suggested that I check with the landlord first — whether they think they have to tell us what’s going on or not, they do, and if their answer is unsatisfactory, or that they did not have reason or raise the screen, I should file a police report. And when I talk to them, I should tell them that I’ve already checked with the police and what they advised. I shot an email off to the landlord, and received both an apology (the “memo” detailing the work is going out today — two weeks after it started) and that the workers swear they didn’t raise the screen.

So I’m guessing I’m going to spend some time over at the PD today.

I also realized that, while the old screens locked, these new ones don’t. A little disturbing, since I like to sleep with the window open at night, and can’t open the bedroom window that’s not over the fire escape because of the air conditioner. I’m going to have to find a way to rig the screen so it can’t be opened from the outside. Yes, if someone really wants to get in, they’d cut it, but why make it easy?

And, of course, the apartment is absolutely filthy from all the brick dust. I could vaccuum and wash floors five times a day and it wouldn’t make a difference. I also find it interesting, that, although they’ve got three scaffoldings up the side of the building, they are only actually working right outside the windows of the long-term tenants the landlord wants out. For nearly two weeks, ten hours a day.

You can’t leave because they’ll wreck something; you can’t stay and hear yourself think. It’s ridiculous.

Anyway, I have some errands to run and bills to pay today, and then I hope to get the marketing materials/cover art paperwork finished for the book, and do some more work on the lectures.

I’m booked for a site job for a couple of days next week, but the one I had for 10 days at the end of September may cancel because the person had a severe accident and may not be out of town after all. Oh, well, that gives me an extra ten days to go house hunting.

To Debra, who commented yesterday– I’m really, really proud of you. You’re worth far more than a content mill, and that sewage whirlpool would suck you dry very quickly. There’s a huge market for articles and information from someone with your experience and insight right now — I bet AARP would hire you to write articles in a heartbeat, along with some of the other big healthcare mags and holsitc mags. I know the transition sucks because you work a kazillion hours, but once you make the shift to being paid what your writing is worth, it makes up for it in financials, professional regard, and self-esteem.

Devon

Published in: on August 12, 2010 at 7:05 am  Comments (5)  
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