Thurs. Feb. 21, 2019: Developing the Monologues

Thursday, February 21, 2019
Waning Moon
Sleeting and cold

Hop over to Gratitude and Growth for the latest post.

Had a decent writing day yesterday, and a good session onsite with a client.

Got out the comic ghost story radio play (numbered draft), along with some other paperwork for them. Waiting to hear back from that company on a few different things, including my contract.

The weather was turning, so I came home after the client session, and worked on contest entries.

SCRATCH, the book about writers and money, is really wonderful. And the experiences can be applied across disciplines in the arts. Someone on social media couldn’t understand how a book about writing could apply to any other art. If everything has to be spelled out directly in your own reference, how can you possibly create art? Art is about going beyond the expected, and knowing how to make connections beyond the obvious.

Also reading A PARIS ALL YOUR OWN, edited by Eleanor Brown, which is a wonderful anthology of writers and their experiences in Paris. It also lists their books. Some of them I’ve read; many I haven’t.

I’m also determined to track down a book by Jeannie Moon. She was disparaged by a person calling herself an author who said that a romance novel where the woman is ten years older than the man is “gross.” How sexist and ageist is that? So now I’m determined to read the book.

Between the lists of Parisian books and Jeannie Moon’s book and recommendations from the post on A Biblio Paradise’s Reader Expansion Challenge, I have a wealth of choices for the next challenge!

Did some work on Gambit Colony.

Watched HIDDEN FIGURES. What a beautiful, beautiful movie! Made me both laugh and cry. I can’t believe it took me so long to sit down and watch it.

Worked on the monologues.

I planned to test one or two of them last night, but decided not to because of the weather. Of course, then the weather didn’t get bad until later, but it would have been a challenge to get home.

Public reading is not something I can do off the cuff. I write for performers; I am not one. But, of course, a professional writer has to give readings. It’s even more layered when it’s from a stage piece that I have no intention of professionally performing — the actors cast will perform it.

However, the monologues from WOMEN WITH AN EDGE have served me well over the years — both in the professional productions where actors have performed the monologues, and in readings all over the world, both live and on radio. Those monologues have been around and performed since the mid 1990’s. The evergreen ones can be called up and spoken/read at the drop of a hat.

I need to test the monologues I’m creating for WOMEN WITH AN EDGE RESIST. At some point, when I have a batch of them, I might call upon some local actors to come over for a session and read. Or hire a rehearsal studio for a few hours, where we can read. Maybe hire a space over at Cape Space.

But right now, it’s too early in the process. I need to speak them myself and gauge a reaction. I need to feel the rhythm in my body in order to revise properly.

When there’s a script with multiple parts, it works better for me to bring in actors and listen to them read. That way, I can feel how individual rhythms develop and make adjustments. (And yes, I’ve often paid actors to come in, sit around a table, and read an early draft of a script).

But with monologues, unless I’m developing a piece with a specific group of actors (which needs time, access to the talent pool, and money), I need to read aloud the initial drafts myself. I need to feel the rhythms in my own body.

After a few drafts of the monologues, then I’ll bring in some actresses, and we’ll work in the room. But I need to test the initial drafts with an audience, once I’ve read them aloud myself a few times. Whenever possible, I also tape the reading, and listen to it for objectivity. I do this when I rehearse readings from my books as well.

By listening, I can figure out rhythm. Where do I need to take a breath? Where can I speed up? Where should I slow down? Is there anything that needs to be cut, because it doesn’t work in the piece?

Anything that is spoken needs to be heard. Simply looking at words on the page isn’t enough. Even when I have enough experience to feel the beats as I write them, I also need to hear them. That’s true of radio, stage, or screenplay. Having actual actors (not just random people) read the words out loud during the development/drafting process makes a huge difference.

Obviously, it was easier to do that in NY than it is here. First, the talent pool is smaller here. Second, even though there are some wildly talented people here, theatre is a “side” not a “priority” and getting people to commit and fulfill that commitment — even for a one-shot reading — is not easy. Anything shiny dangled in front of them will take priority.

It gets frustrating. But it is also vital to the process.

But I can’t just decide at the last minute whether or not I’ll read. I have to feel confident that the draft I have is ready for comment. In other words, it will have gone through several drafts, and I will feel it’s solid enough to have feedback.

Then, I have to rehearse it, so it feels natural when I speak it, and I’ve found its innate rhythm and show it off as best as I, a non-performer, can.

Had I gone last night, I would have read “Smile!” and possible “Emotional Lifting.”
“My Life in Quicksand” is still an unfinished first draft; while I’m having fun with it, it’s nowhere near ready to be read yet. Most likely, I would have just read “Smile!”

I’d rehearsed, to the point where I felt as comfortable as I can feel when reading. Which is “never very.”

But then, I have to gear up myself emotionally. I need the focus of my emotional energy to be set aside for that reading. For several days leading up to a reading date, I pace myself differently, and I store up the necessary energy, so I can tap into it during the reading. I do this when I teach in person, too, or attend a conference.

Even though I wrote during the day. Even though I did client work during the day. I had to pace myself and save myself.

So add in a storm to the mix, snow and sleet, and bad road conditions at night, in an area where people are lousy drivers on a good day — I made the decision the night before, based on the weather forecast that said it would start getting nasty in the late afternoon, not to go.

In other words, that saved emotional energy was then released and dissipated into other projects.

I kept waiting for the storm to start. It didn’t.

Part of me was tempted to just drive to the open mic and read.

Only I’d used up the emotional energy I needed in order to read well on other projects during the day, because I’d made the decision not to read that night. Could I have read?

It would have been flat. It wouldn’t have given the audience something worthy of response, which meant I wouldn’t have gotten what I needed for the next draft.

It was snowing a little after eight, so it was a moot point anyway. I wouldn’t have gotten home until nearly ten (I don’t read and run — I stay for everyone’s work, and then we usually chat).

Have I ever just stepped in and stepped up to an unexpected opportunity? Or a request to fill in for someone who backed out at the last minute?

Of course I have. I’ve done well. Because I dig deeper, making like a hockey player, and use the adrenaline rush. I’m wiped out after, but I can do it.

I can do it not with new material, but because, after all these years, I have a wealth of material and experiences I can use to draw from in a spontaneous talk. It’s been hard-won, but it’s there.

So that was my Wednesday night.

Today, I have lots of admin and LOIs to do, then yoga, then, hopefully, a good afternoon writing and working on contest entries and the book I’m reviewing. I also am prepping for my client meeting tomorrow.

Which means that tomorrow’s post will go up late, probably in the early afternoon.

We have more storms this weekend, so I’ll tuck in to read and write.

 

Wed. Feb. 20, 2019: Middle Day

Wednesday, February 20, 2019
Last Day of Full Moon
Expecting another storm

Hop on over to Ink-Dipped Advice for the weekly take on business.

Client work was fine yesterday.

Sent off the comic ghost story radio play. Dug into the Straw Hat Circuit mystery radio drama. Worked on the monologue, but we’re supposed to get another storm tonight, so I might not be able to go and test it.

I had to order a copy of a book I know I own, that I need as background, from the library, because I don’t know where my copy is packed. I need to live somewhere with enough space to unpack all my books!

Prepping for a meeting with a potential new client on Friday.

Ridiculously excited that the leek and scallion seeds have already started to sprout.

That’s pretty much the deal. I’m writing and reading and working a lot. It’s a typical middle day in a busy week, but a least it’s the good kind of busy.

With all the chaos going on, I’m going to grab as many moments of happiness, or a least contentment, as I can!

Published in: on February 20, 2019 at 6:28 am  Leave a Comment  
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Tues. Feb. 19, 2019: Writing & Weather

Tuesday, February 19. 2019
Full Moon
Sunny and not too cold

Hop on over to A Biblio Paradise to see how I fared reading horror on the first month of the Reader Expansion Challenge. My choice this time around was in the horror genre, and I read Grady Hendrix’s WE SOLD OUR SOULS.

I cut myself some slack this holiday weekend. I did a lot of reading: what I felt like reading just because, research for various projects, contest entries, and the next book I have to review.

Writing-wise, I finished the short comic ghost radio play, “Horace House Hauntings” and polished it. The ending had to be rewritten quite a few times, because it kept going off track. Then, I changed the murderer (again), and it all fell into place. It goes out to the company in Minnesota today.

Started the next comic radio mystery play, which is set in the Straw Hat Circuit. I was going to set it in the early 1950’s, but the heyday was in the late 30’s, so I’m moving it back. I’ve been playing with titles for it. And I’m going to have a running joke about wardrobe in it. I got about 12 pages done on it, and it’s not quite as comic as I expected. More of a drama. And likely a two-parter, not wound up in a single 30 minute episode.

Worked on GAMBIT COLONY more than I should have — I have other pieces on a tighter deadline.

Worked on the monologue, to the point of rehearsing it. Still not sure if it’s ready to test by tomorrow night. Plus, there’s another storm coming in tomorrow night, so it might be again a moot point.

Sunday night into Monday, we had a snowstorm. Not anywhere near as bad as predicted, but I was glad I didn’t have to go in for any client work. Especially since they didn’t bother to plow the road, and it got mushy, and then icy. It meant I also couldn’t get out of our little road and down to Provincetown for the only local protest against this false National Emergency the Narcissistic Sociopath Autocrat declared.

Shoveling wasn’t too bad, except for the place where the plow packed everything at the bottom of the driveway. That’s always killer. Me with my little orange shovel having to undo what a two-ton plow packed down.

Monday’s meditation group was cancelled, due to the storm, and I missed it.

Today, I’m with a client most of the day, and then some other appointments; same tomorrow.

Plus, of course, writing.

Published in: on February 19, 2019 at 10:05 am  Leave a Comment  
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Fri. Feb. 8, 2019: Thoughts, Decisions, Weights

Friday, February 8, 2019
Waxing Moon
Rainy and mild

Yesterday’s meeting went well in some respects, but gave me a lot of to think about. There are facets to weigh, positives, negatives, possibilities.

My head says one thing, my heart another, my gut a third.

So we’ll see.

I read Barbara Ross’s STEAMED OPEN, which was a lot of fun. I like that series a lot, and she mentions Wiscasset, one of my favorite places in Maine.

I’m pretty sure I’m off track with the radio play, so I have to rip apart the second half and fix it.

Working on the book I have to review. Sending out a bunch of LOIs. Working on contest entries this weekend, along with the monologues, the radio play, and the novels.

I feel discouraged on several fronts, like there are obstacles pushing me in a direction I’m not sure I want to go. But I can’t stay where i am, either. There has to be movement. But perhaps it’s in a direction I haven’t yet explored.

So this weekend will also contain a lot of reflection.

And planting. There are seeds that need planting!

And writing.

And reading.

Have a good one.

Published in: on February 8, 2019 at 9:50 am  Comments Off on Fri. Feb. 8, 2019: Thoughts, Decisions, Weights  
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Friday, February 1, 2019: Preparing for a Happy Weekend

Friday, February 01, 2019
Waning Moon
Sunny and cold

Yesterday wound up being one of the most quietly happy days I’ve had in a long time.

Hop on over to the GDR site to check out my February To-Do list. Which will need adjustments, because some things are happening that will recalibrate the rest of my year. It’s all good, but will need flexibility on my part to make it work.

I had a good phone meeting with a potential client this morning, and we will meet in person next week.

The radio play split into the 2-part version and the short play to fill the remaining time in that second slot went out yesterday, along with another requested radio play.

I set up nearly a month’s worth of marketing posts for my books on Twuffer; however, they don’t seem to be posting. (Note: I fixed it; time zone issue. Phew)

In the afternoon, I drafted half of the new comic ghost story radio play. It’s a lot of fun, and, as with the other comedies, a little silly. But that’s part of what makes it work. I hope to finish the draft this weekend, let it sit, and revise next week, so it can go out the following week.

As soon as that draft is done, I dive right into the straw hat theatre comedy.

WHILE I’m juggling the novel revisions and working on the monologues and working on the first act of the anti-gun violence play AND research for the Venetian play and the two women writers play.

So it’s busy. But the right kind of busy, which makes me happy.

It’s supposed to get warmer this weekend. First planting should be tomorrow – my seeds haven’t arrived yet, so I’ll have to find something to plant.

Imbolc tomorrow – I’m looking forward to it.

I want to have a happy weekend of reading and writing, because the next few weeks will be very, very busy.

Have a lovely weekend!

Published in: on February 1, 2019 at 11:09 am  Comments Off on Friday, February 1, 2019: Preparing for a Happy Weekend  
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Thurs. Jan. 24, 2019: More Writing Opportunities

Thursday, January 24, 2019
Waning Moon
Rainy and milder

The fluctuating temperatures are rough on my body. I dress in layers, so I can adjust. But zooming back and forth between the 50s and the 20s every few hours is taking a toll.

Have had some steadily good writing sessions in the past few days, and I intend to keep that up, even though I have company coming in for the weekend.

Got another acceptance for a radio play last night, for one of my comic noir mysteries, by a company in the Midwest. They’ve also asked for more scripts. So that makes me happy.

I love writing for radio. It’s my favorite format.

Still sick; can’t seem to shake this. It’s been hanging on for most of January, and it’s slowing me down.

Working with my editor and publisher to recalibrate the release schedule for this year, because it’s more important for the books to be good than just spit them out. And, because of the problems the WH is causing with international trade deals, we’re having problems with the print editions. But it will all sort out. Patience, communication, and showing up to do the work will get it done.

I’ve been researching both Canaletto and the Algonquin Round Table for plays, and working on the monologues for WOMEN WITH AN EDGE RESIST. So I’m juggling a lot. I have four plays to write this year, along with three-four novels for the end of this year into next year, and a couple of radio scripts. Plus adaptations. Plus getting some of my film and television scripts into contests.

So it’s a lot. It’s the good kind of busy, but it’s busy. At the same time, I have to keep up constantly pitching to clients and for article assignments. No wonder my brain is tired. I will have to build in some vacation time this year where I do absolutely NOTHING. Or my brain will break.

In the meantime, we have lousy weather, and I’m trying to get everything done before the worst of it. I will be alternating this afternoon between writing, reading, and cleaning the house in advance of company.

I hope you’re all having a wonderful, creative time.

Published in: on January 24, 2019 at 10:12 am  Comments Off on Thurs. Jan. 24, 2019: More Writing Opportunities  
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Mon. July 9, 2018: Say “Yes” — #UpbeatAuthors

Monday, July 9, 2018
Waning Moon
Jupiter Retrograde
Saturn Retrograde
Pluto Retrograde
Neptune Retrograde
Mars Retrograde

 

There’s a saying I’ve heard about both opportunity and the Muse: that when it knocks, you better answer or it will move on to someone else.

I believe that.

Of course, there are those who will insist they are “offering” you an “opportunity” to try to get them to work for free while they do nothing. Laugh and walk away. That is not something you to which you want to say “yes.”

But say “yes” to new experiences that are out of your comfort zone, but that you might enjoy. I did that with Argentine Tango – I said “yes” to taking classes for a few months. Not only did I have the chance to do something I hadn’t done in years – dance – I met new people, learned about a world-wide community, and gathered material for at least three new books. I even put a tango scene into my radio play “Light Behind the Eyes” which was produced this past March.

I said “yes” to attending my very first Bouchercon way back in the mid-1990s, and that was the catalyst to writing novels again. I said “yes” to my very first Edinburgh Festival Fringe, which led me to an invitation to participate in the Adelaide Festival Fringe, which meant I got to go to Australia, something I’d always wanted to do. And I got to go there as a working artist.

In Australia, I said “yes” to a local networking meeting someone I’d met in passing invited me to, which led me to saying “yes” to a curator for the library, who invited me to see an illuminated manuscript, one of the most beautiful books I’ve ever seen in my life. I said “yes” to doing a promo on a local radio show – which got such a positive response that I wound up co-hosting the show while we were at festival. I said “yes” to an invitation to an art gallery opening, where I was exposed to stunning work by Aboriginal artists depicting the sections in Australia where the ozone layers are burned all the way through. I said “yes” to an invitation to join a group of Aborginal women artists for their morning coffee – a rare honor, since they didn’t mingle with the other festival participants often – and learned a whole new way of communicating and relating.

I said “yes” the first time I was invited, in my first theatre lighting class in college, to working on the crew of a show – and that, eventually, led me to my career on Broadway.

I said “yes” in high school, when I was starting to learn cello, but they needed more viola players and asked me to switch. And I learned the viola (not that I remember it after all these years, but still . . .)

I said “yes” when I was just getting back into thoroughbred racing to work on a benefit to help racetrack workers have access to childcare and ended up with lifelong friends among trainers, jockeys, backstretch workers, which led me to pitch (and accept) a job covering the Triple Crown for thirteen years, and go to races in England and Scotland.

I said “yes” when given the opportunity to write about ice hockey and spent months with a minor league time; I said “yes” when given the opportunity to cover America’s Cup and learned about sailing and those beautiful old Newport yachts (even though I can’t swim). I said “yes” to covering Highland Games and local sports and lighthouses and restaurants and anything else that sounded interesting.

I can’t even count the times I’ve said “yes” – because I say “yes” more than I say “no” – especially if it means a new experience. I trust my gut – if something seems off about the offer, or I figure it’s dangerous in the wrong way, I decline.

But I trust my gut, and saying “yes” means I had opportunities and experiences many others around me haven’t. I ask questions. I’m interested in the world. So when someone offers me a chance to do something unique, especially by someone who is passionate about their interests, I try to say “yes” and then enjoy it!

 

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

Wednesday, June 22, 2011
Waning Moon
Saturn Retrograde
Pluto Retrograde
Rainy and warm

Got some good writing done yesterday, and caught up with my students, too. Booked a spot at Friday’s writers’ breakfast — I get to support Carol McCleary, who I met a few months ago and who writes the mysteries featuring Nelly Bly. The organizer congratulated me on my new book, and wondered if I’d step into a slot on the radio show taping Friday afternoon, since someone cancelled? I jumped at the chance. So I’ll be headed from the breakfast to the studio!

The owner came home and fixed the toilet, so we’re back to having two working toilets in the house, which is great. Costume Imp did some stuff in the yard.

Imp and I drove over to Falmouth, to the new farmers’ market over on the Barnstable Fairgrounds. It’s in early stages, so not much was there yet, but I bought some fabulous soap! I know, me and my soap, every time I see handmade soap, I’ve got to buy some.

I showed him Ashumet Holly Sanctuary, which is right beside the Fairgrounds. Last time I was there, the fields were completely flat, and the hollies were prominent because the other trees were bare. Now, the fields are waist high in clover and daisies and other plants, and all the trees are leafy, so the hollies are tucked in among them.

We were hungry, and decided to head over to Dennis to the new Summer Stock restaurant. It’s on the grounds that house the Cape Playhouse, the cinema, and the art museum. The Cape Playhouse has been running since 1927 — a place based on such a compound would be a great setting for a comic mystery.

The restaurant is wonderful. The design’s good, the presentation’s good, and the food is outstanding. Prices are reasonable — not cheap, but fair for the area and what you get is well worth it. The staff is really friendly. Definitely a place to which I want to return often.

We wandered back to the Playhouse’s gift shop and found a poster featuring one of the actresses we’ve both worked with, along with one of my favorite actors. They appeared in a show here together — from the photo, it looks like sometime in the 70s or early 80s. I had to get it! Can’t wait to tell her what I found!

Took a peek at the Art Museum. They have some interesting opportunities there, not your run-of-the-mill stuff. I’ll have to look into it further.

Came home, hung out on the deck for a bit, and Imp cooked dinner. I scarfed it down, and then dashed down the road to the Beautification Committee meeting. We had a good meeting, we each have a list of things we need to get done, and solid dates.

Came home, and Imp and I had our Summer Solstice out on the deck. It was lovely. Nice way to turn the wheel!

To bed late, up early. It wasn’t supposed to rain, so I did my morning watering, but now it looks like there will be a cloudburst any minute! I have a LOT to get done today, wrapping up a few things for the Mermaid Ball meeting tomorrow, getting postcards printed to take to the breakfast, preparing myself for the radio interview, and preparing for the trip to Newport this weekend. Imp and I have to deal with my costume for the Ball today, too, and he has to get ready, because he heads back to “the concrete jungle” tomorrow. I’ve got some environmental science books I have to finish reading/taking notes on, and a press list to cross check. And my daily writing quota, and my students.

Off I go!

Devon


ASSUMPTION OF RIGHTavailable from Champagne Books.
Annabel Aidan webpage here.

Saturday, November 15, 2008

Saturday, November 15, 2008
Waning Moon
Neptune Retrograde
Rainy and cool

Long and Short Reviews sent me an exciting email to let me know that HEX BREAKER is in the running as “Best Book” for this past week. It’s a poll, and voting is only open today and tomorrow. If you get a chance, please go here:

http://www.longandshortreviews.com/LASR/recentrev.htm
and vote for me! (If you liked the book, of course, if you don’t have a book in the running, or if you don’t have a friend whose book you’d like to vote for).

It was nice to come back to that email, let me tell you, because yesterday was quite a day.

Chase gets yet another Middle Finger Award. ‘Nuff said. I have a distinct feeling it will get yet another of those rewards today, too.

Metro North was late – as usual. And the conductors are too damned stupid to figure out if doors are open or closed, so, please, just send them back to kindergarten and let five and six year olds who have some common sense run the railroads.

Manhattan was full of fashion disasters yesterday. One was a girl of about ten, who can be forgiven. She wore red and black plaid shorts with a red sweater and tights. Okay, not too bad. Except that the tights had a black and white checkerboard pattern that fought with the plaid in the shorts rather than complimented it. Even at age ten, she couldn’t pull it off.

Then, there was the woman in her thirties. Healthy figure, not too big, not stick thin. But she wore a skirt in cobalt blue, black, and yellow plaid SATIN, above the knee, that fell in ruffled tiers. Now, it was just shy of being a mini-skirt, so probably 14-20 inches from waist to hem. And it had FIVE tiers. I counted ‘em. It wouldn’t have suited a beanpole, much less a human being. It was paired with thick black tights, a blunt, flat boot, and a baggy cardigan sweater. And her friend, a few years younger, wore a mini dress in sparkling horizontal blue and gold stripes. Really not attractive. If it was for an evening event, paired with navy sheer stockings, a bit of a heel, and some simple jewelry, she could have pulled it off. But in the middle of the day, worn with clunky black opaque tights, flat UGGS, and a bulky, unattractive man’s varsity-style jacket she probably wore to tell the world that yes, she IS having sex – it didn’t work. I hope they lost a bet or something and hadn’t chosen those outfits! And I found it hard to believe that they were coming home from the previous night at 11 in the morning – if that was the case, they’d be cabbing it, not strolling up Fifth Avenue smoking menthol cigarettes!

They just didn’t have enough individual charisma to pull it off. There are those who could have looked like they were marching to a very unique fashion drummer, but not these two. Individually, the pieces weren’t all that bad (except, in my opinion, the plaid satin skirt), but the way they were put together didn’t work.

Came back home, ran some errands, visited my friend in her new place, cooked dinner, and had a quiet evening.

Woke up around 5 this morning after dreaming that I was doing some work with Vice President Elect Joe Biden. I mean, I know I’m enthusiastic about this new administration and all, but that’s a little ridiculous!

I’m at the struggling point in Nano, which I usually hit between 30-40K. Urgh. A struggle, even though I have a good idea where I’m going. But I just push through.

I heard from my editor and we seem to have worked things out. I’ll know by the end of next week. I’m little leery at this point.

Don’t forget, I’m on the radio tomorrow at 4 PM EST:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/kims

Back to the page.

Devon

Untitled Helena Francis Mystery – 35,044 words out of 50,000 (Nano goal)

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
35 / 50
(70.0%)

Untitled Helena Francis Mystery – 35,044 words out of est. 75,000 (total goal)

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
35 / 75
(46.7%)

Devon’s Bookstore:

NEW!Sensory Perceptions: Techniques to Improve Your Writing Through the Six Senses by Devon Ellington. Use the six senses to take your writing to the next level via a series of sense-specific exercises. By the end of seven weeks, you complete seven short stories!. $1.29 USD. Here.

Free limited download
“The Possession of Nattie Filmore: A Jain Lazarus Adventure” by Devon Ellington. If you loved HEX BREAKER, you’ll love spending time with Jain and Wyatt as they try to solve a haunted house mystery. Read an excerpt of the story and download it free here


Hex Breaker
by Devon Ellington. A Jain Lazarus Adventure. Hex Breaker Jain Lazarus joins the crew of a cursed film, hoping to put to rest what was stirred up before more people die and the film is lost. Tough, practical Detective Wyatt East becomes her unlikely ally and lover on an adventure fighting zombies, ceremonial magicians, the town wife-beater, the messenger of the gods, and their own pasts.
$4.00 ebook/ $6.00 on CD from Firedrakes Weyr Publishing.
Visit the site for the Jain Lazarus adventures.

Back By Popular Demand!
30 Tips for 30 Days: Kick Start Your Novel and Get Out of Your Own Way. A Nano Handbook by Devon Ellington. FREE!
If you’ve ever wondered whether or not you could survive National Novel Writing Month, this is the handbook for you! Ideas on preparations, setting goals, overcoming blocks, pushing yourself, tips for each day of the process, and ideas for going beyond, this handbook by veteran Nano-er Devon Ellington will help you survive. Best of all, it’s free! Download it here.
Limited time offer


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

Friday, November 14, 2008

Friday, November 14, 2008
Waning Moon
Neptune Retrograde
Rainy and chilly

Thanks so much for bringing the review to my attention! I had no idea that HEX BREAKER had been reviewed by Long and Short Reviews.

There’s also an excerpt up for “The Ramsey Chase”, the first Cornelia True/Roman Gray adventure.

Hopefully, that whets your appetite for the whole story!

Busy day yesterday, with lots of busy-ness and business, but it will all be fine. Chase gets yet another Middle Finger Award (I think they’re going for the world record). I don’t even want to go into it, I just want these banks held accountable for fucking up regularly and screwing their customers up various portions of their anatomy whenever possible.

Oh, and gee, that bailout package that the Treasury Secretary swore was necessary to get credit flowing? Turns out the banks aren’t flowing credit, they’re hoarding it and/or using it to give the executives who got us into this mess more bonuses. In other words, Mr. Treasury Secretary, the facts have NOT changed, as you claim – you implemented a stupid idea that the people of this country didn’t want because we’re all smart enough to KNOW it’s a stupid idea, you lied to Congress about accountability, and now we’ve all seen how it DOESN’T WORK. Why isn’t this guy being kicked to the curb? Oh, yeah, friend of Bush’s, so for the next 60 days or so, he can continue to destroy the country economically.

Got a bunch of books mailed off for BookMooch people, which was good.

Went up to Somers to visit long-time family friends, which was lovely, although the drive in the rain in unfamiliar territory was challenging.

Got yet another vague email from an editor who owes me a payment that has all sorts of excuses and apologies, but nothing about payment, so I sent an email that was an only slightly more diplomatic version of “s— or get off the pot.” This money was budgeted, I’ve been left dangling for SIX MONTHS, you either want it or you don’t, tell me and either pay me or don’t, but stop this nebulous maybe sometime honoring the contract in the future. Pay me or reject the piece. Not that I could ever use it for anything else, but, at this point, I honestly don’t care. The frustration level isn’t worth it.

This is why, if you ever see a clause that states “pays on acceptance”, you must, must MUST add a clause putting a time limit on said acceptance, or you can be kept dangling for years. Learn from my mistake! Also, when the contract says “pays on publication”, negotiate an actual date.

Really, was there enough yoga to calm me down last night? I don’t think so!

On a happy note, I will be on Kim Smith’s radio show this Sunday night, 4 PM EST, 3 PM CST, and here’s the URL:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/kims

I will also appear on The League of Extraordinary Paranormal Women’s radio show on December 11 – but don’t worry, I’ll remind you again. AND, Long and Short Reviews, who gave HEX BREAKER such a nice mention, will also run an interview with me; as soon as I have the date, I’ll post it.

I’ve got to hop into the city quickly, run errands when I get back out, and get back to the page. I’ve hit my Week 2 Wall of Resistance in Nano – urgh. Barely got out 1500 words this morning.

Devon

Untitled Helena Francis Mystery — 32,487 words out of 50,000 (Nano goal)

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
32 / 50
(64.0%)

Untitled Helena Francis Mystery –32,487 words out of est. 75,000 (total goal)

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
32 / 75
(42.7%)

Devon’s Bookstore:

NEW!Sensory Perceptions: Techniques to Improve Your Writing Through the Six Senses by Devon Ellington. Use the six senses to take your writing to the next level via a series of sense-specific exercises. By the end of seven weeks, you complete seven short stories!. $1.29 USD. Here.

Free limited download
“The Possession of Nattie Filmore: A Jain Lazarus Adventure” by Devon Ellington. If you loved HEX BREAKER, you’ll love spending time with Jain and Wyatt as they try to solve a haunted house mystery. Read an excerpt of the story and download it free here


Hex Breaker
by Devon Ellington. A Jain Lazarus Adventure. Hex Breaker Jain Lazarus joins the crew of a cursed film, hoping to put to rest what was stirred up before more people die and the film is lost. Tough, practical Detective Wyatt East becomes her unlikely ally and lover on an adventure fighting zombies, ceremonial magicians, the town wife-beater, the messenger of the gods, and their own pasts.
$4.00 ebook/ $6.00 on CD from Firedrakes Weyr Publishing.
Visit the site for the Jain Lazarus adventures.

Back By Popular Demand!
30 Tips for 30 Days: Kick Start Your Novel and Get Out of Your Own Way. A Nano Handbook by Devon Ellington. FREE!
If you’ve ever wondered whether or not you could survive National Novel Writing Month, this is the handbook for you! Ideas on preparations, setting goals, overcoming blocks, pushing yourself, tips for each day of the process, and ideas for going beyond, this handbook by veteran Nano-er Devon Ellington will help you survive. Best of all, it’s free! Download it here.
Limited time offer


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

Tuesday, June 17, 2008

Tuesday, June 17, 2008
Waxing Moon
Pluto Retrograde
Jupiter Retrograde
Mercury Retrograde
Neptune Retrograde
Hazy, hot, humid

Well, THAT was an adventure! I got a call around 6 PM last night from my publisher, inviting me to be on her radio show, Dragon’s Den – in two hours! Of course I said yes. Jumped in with both feet. Hopefully I didn’t sound like too much of an idiot – at least there were three of us there. I love doing radio, so I had a good time.

You can hear the whole one hour broadcast yourself here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/FDWP

It would be the broadcast with last night’s date on it. Honestly, I’m not sure if it’s up yet, or if it will be uploaded later.

They wanted to know something no one knows about me. Um, isn’t there a reason why NO ONE KNOWS IT? 😉 Seriously, though, I said that I was 35 before I gave up my dream of being an astronaut. Which is true.

And then someone made a comment about reaching the stars, and I said, “No, I dress them.”

Which, for those of you who know I work on Broadway, makes sense. For the rest, not so much.

But for any of you who found this blog thanks to last night’s radio show: Hi and welcome. And thanks for all the wonderful emails coming in about the show!

Oh, and I was told my release date for HEX BREAKER: August 1.

Again, those of you who know me well know what an important date August 1 is to me.

There will be an audio version of the book, and I may even teach some online workshops for the company.

I’ll post cover art as soon as I have it, and, as soon as I have it, I can start ordering the “stuff” that you’ll be able to win!

Had a great meeting with my producer regarding SIDEKICK. The title will be changed, and there are a few tweaks that need to happen, but we’re all set and going to contract. The play will open the theatre’s season in January 2009.

I’ve got some other play news percolating – if we go to contract on anything, I will make sure to let everyone know.

Got my contract for the date book articles. I can get started on them this week.

Thanks for all the good wishes for my grandmother’s recovery. The sad truth is that she won’t recover; she may rally for awhile, but she’s been so ill for so long, that it’s simply more of a slow fade out. And it’s heartbreaking.

I didn’t get much writing done yesterday; I was too frazzled between my grandmother’s illness, the arrangements that need to be made, and building crap. Yes, there’s more building crap.

So I need to get my head together today and get to work. Now that I have more deadlines piling up, there’s no luxury for having slow writing days. I need to get my contracted articles out of the way, I need to get to work on the next story with the crew of The Merry’s Dalliance, tentatively entitled “The Poison Gold”. Many thanks to one of my actors on the show – something he said to me the other night gave me the idea for the story, thank goodness, because I had no idea what adventure to take my characters on next! And now I do!

I need to finish OLD-FASHIONED DETECTIVE WORK asap and get started on revisions, so that can go to my publisher, and get started on the story told through Billy Root’s eyes (we first meet Billy in HEX BREAKER as well). I think I’ll call Billy’s story LESSONS IN PRACTICALITY. I need to do the revisions on SIDEKICK and THE MATILDA MURDERS. I need to do a revision on “Yuri’s Tale” and get that out.

In other words, no more lazy days or excuses – there’s writing to be done!

Devon

Devon’s Bookstore:


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

Published in: on June 17, 2008 at 6:16 am  Comments (7)  
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