Wednesday, April 30, 2008

Wednesday, April 30, 2008
Waning Moon
Saturn Retrograde
Pluto Retrograde
Sunny and cool

Cold, rainy day yesterday.

Worked on the adaptation. In this section, I can stay close to the original screenplay; however, I have to add quite a bit later on for it all to make sense and really hold together as a novel. There are quick explanations that one can get away with in a screenplay that simply won’t hold up in the novel. For it to have the emotional impact I want, I have to deepen it, layer it, work out some of the kinks. I’m also deepening the relationship between Zenda and Sam earlier. While, if this was visual and I had three-dimensional actors working the material, a great deal could be left unsaid. Their bodies would do the “speaking” instead of the words. In the novelization, a great deal remains unspoken between them, but it still needs to be on the page. Even if it’s done through action and gesture and behavior rather than narration, it still needs to be there.

Worked on Yuri’s Tale. Actually, I stopped working to make some continuity notes and do some world-building. The problem with that is that I wind up staring at the page. Unlike Earth Bride, where I could do dozens of pages of world-building as I created the outline and THEN write, the participants in Yuri’s Tale want to reveal it to me as it goes along. So I’m doing more note-taking than world-building and letting the characters reveal the world to be in this draft. A little frustrating, but. . .that’s the way it is. Also, I realized I need to start the book with Esmé, not Yuri (yet another reason the title needs to change). At first I thought it could be a prologue, but the more I mull it over, the more I realize no, it needs to be a chapter focused on Esmé before they arrive in Solmer and Yuri’s taven. I’ll set part of it on the ship The Sea Trotter, and part of it . . .well, you’ll just have to read it to find out!

This is the kind of situation where a writer who insists on total control over everything from the get-go would just stop. But, if you trust your characters (i.e., your subconscious) to get you through even the disjointed bits, you’ll push through and have something better at the end than if you tried to control it all so tightly before you set a word on paper. Rewrites are good places to impose structure and logic. First drafts are to trust your characters and your imagination.

Did an extra yoga session yesterday afternoon and it made a big difference.

Commute sucked both ways, and too many SFT’s in the city. Brandy and Melissa, you wouldn’t behave like an SFT, because you naturally think about others. It’s your nature. I don’t mind the tourists who come here and are amazed by all the wonderful things in New York; I mind the ones who are rude, thoughtless (it’s not New Yorkers who are rude, it’s the tourists), and treat those of us who live here as though we’re their personal maids.

Show was fine. I had to tell one of my Dear Hearts this was our last week working together on this show; he’s off to do another show (he’ll be wonderful in it) and I’m covering the Preakness during his last weekend on this show. So we are going to savor every performance together this week! Seriously, working with these actors is always good for me – they’re loving and joyful as well as being talented, and working with them opens my heart a little every time. Which is good, considering how closed and ready for battle I always have to be in my own home.

I have to go and pitch a fit at the credit union this morning. It seems anyone can walk up to any ATM and wipe out my checking and savings, as they did in January, but I can’t get to my own money, and I’m sick of it.

Taped a show last night on which I thought an acquaintance was guest-starring (because he told me so). He’d teased me that he’d call at midnight to see how I liked it (I got home at 11). So I watch the whole darned thing – and he’s not on it! He called, I mentioned it, and he said, “Yeah, that kind of sucks, doesn’t it?” I’m not sure if the episodes got shuffled around or he’s in an upcoming one or what. And it’s not a show I’d watch if he hadn’t told me he had a guest spot! He so owes me! 😉

Very short writing day today; I have two shows and I have to take a train shortly after 10:30. I want to get more writing done before that, so this is a short post.

Devon

Adaptation: 23,460 words out of est. 90,000

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
23 / 90
(25.6%)

Devon’s Bookstore:


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

Monday, April 28, 2008

Monday, April 28, 2008
Waning Moon
Saturn Retrograde
Pluto Retrograde
Rainy and cool

The new issue of The Scruffy Dog Review is out, which means my latest installment of “The Literary Athlete” is up. It’s called “In Between” and gives suggestions what to do while your manuscript makes the rounds. You can find it here.

The Pre-Derby article is off, and should be up in a couple of days. The monologue went off, the actor read it via web-cam, I did a rewrite, sent it off, we worked via webcam, I tweaked. I think it’s in good shape. I sent him one final tweak when I got home last night; if he’s comfortable, he can memorize it (his audition is tomorrow).

I didn’t get the script doctoring job. They decided to go with someone else (who has no published credits and has never written in play or screenplay format) who was willing to do it for the “experience” rather than pay. Now, they asked me for a quote when they approached me about the job, presented it as a paying job, and told me the scope of the project and the overall budget. I gave them a fair price, and, as far as I knew, this was a paying job, or I would have refused outright. Suddenly, they gave me the “option” of “we really want you to do this, but we decided we’re not paying anyone to punch up dialogue.” I don’t think so. You guys have no track record, I have no personal reason to work with you other than the actor who recommended me, you wouldn’t let me read the whole script, you’d only send me the few scenes you wanted punched up if I took the job (even after I explained why reading the whole script would be useful in punching up the dialogue of the specific scenes), and have been through six (count ‘em) writers so far. Usually, at least the courtesy of a deferred payment agreement is offered. Or, if you really don’t/can’t pay, you pull in favors from people you know really well, not strangers who have no reason to do anything for you. Their parting volley was amusing: “I’d bet you’d do this for free for a friend” to which I responded, “Probably. For a friend.” Whatever, it’s not my film, I’m not invested in any way. I feel badly for the actor who suggested me for the gig, who’s very unhappy with the scripts thus far. He only agreed to do it because he knew the first writer on the film – who was subsequently “replaced.” Honestly, it sounds like a nightmare-in-embryo to me.

The timing’s good, because I really don’t see how I could have taken it on this week while I’m in shows and doing a three hour daily commute and still have done my best work. I would have, but not landing it takes pressure off me, and that’s always welcome. I’m also enough of an optimist to believe it simply means some other opportunity to which I am better suited will come down the pike.

Besides, I have a Kentucky Derby for which to prep! After all, I’m in shows through Friday night and the Derby is on Saturday! I’m cutting it a little close this year.

Worked on the adaptation some more. I think I can add in one of the scenes I was sad to cut out of the screenplay due to time and space issues – it could be lots of fun here, and shore up the relationships among the secondary characters.

The trip to and from the city sucked, and there were far too many SFT’s to climb over (no, it’s not a venereal disease, it’s “stupid fucking tourists” and I don’t care what anyone says, THEY do not pay MY bills, so I can call them as I see them).

Show was fine, went smoothly, we had lots of fun. Once I’m in the building, it’s fine, but it’s getting to and from the theatre that makes it such a hassle.

Caught up with a colleague I hadn’t seen in ages, who’s very excited that Dreamworks is starting to produce on Broadway. He thinks they’ll be really good producers. They trust that the people they hire know what they’re doing and are honest with them, they let them do their jobs, and they don’t nickel and dime them to death. They’re willing to spend the money; in return, they want honest quotes, honest work, and that things are delivered on time, which seems perfectly fair to me. They seem to be thinking ahead so that there will be a minimum of scrambling at the last minute. That’s the kind of producers we need on Broadway, and there’s been a dearth of them with the corporate bean counters taking over instead of actual producers. So, let’s see if they come through as well as they’re starting, and, if so, it’ll be great for Broadway, and theatre in general.

Caught up with another colleague who I just think is one of our most exciting emerging artists; she’s getting ready to spend time in Europe again this summer, at an artists’ colony in Germany, working on a project. I’m delighted for her.

I have a friend visiting for a couple of days; he arrived yesterday and will be here until tomorrow. He’s been working in Canada and is on his way back home to Europe for the summer; it’ll be great to spend a few days together. He’s had a rough year, and he’s certainly been a life raft in stormy seas for me enough times, so I’m happy to return the favor.

Off to get some writing done. I want to finish at least one, maybe two short stories today so I can give them a polish tomorrow and get them out. And there was a very funny little incident on the train coming home last night that’s the seed of another story. I don’t want to relate it here, because it will dilute it – you’ll have to wait and read the story. I’m going to take what actually happened and then push its boundaries.

It’s a rainy, gloomy day, but we need the water after 13 days with no rain; as long as it’s steady and not so hard the brook breaks its banks, I’ll be happy.

Getting ready for a busy week at the show, and trying to balance it with the writing.

Devon

Adaptation: 20,808 words out of est. 90,000

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
20 / 90
(22.2%)

Devon’s Bookstore:


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

Monday, March 17, 2008

Monday, March 17, 2008
Waxing Moon
Saturn Retrograde
St. Patrick’s Day
Sunny and mild

Quick post, as I’m running out the door.

Happy Birthday Barbara and Fran!

Hop on over to Mystic Lit to read the first of my three guest blogs on research in writing. They’ll run for three consecutive Mondays. And drop a comment by, so I know you’ve visited!

Weekend was good. Unproductive, but good. Gave myself time off from writing, for the most part. Managed to polish the query letter and I’m finally happy with it.

Worked out like crazy – it felt wonderful, but I’m sore.

Was feeling better about life, the universe, and everything until I came back to the apartment, saw everything that needs to be done, and the battles still to fight and got soul-crushingly depressed.

An extra-long yoga session this morning helped.

The crane accident in NYC is very upsetting. Not only did 4 people die, over a dozen injured, and three are missing, but an entire brownstone was crushed and those people lost everything. For the Mayor of NYC to shrug and say 13 open violation is “usual” for a project of this size is unacceptable. A three-strikes-you’re-out policy must be implemented against these greedy developers. Three strikes and you forfeit the right to develop the property. Period. Let’s face it – none of these people are in it to “better” a neighborhood. They’re in it to make obscene amounts of money off the backs of others. Developers need to start “paying for their sins” because that’s pretty much all they do – hurt people and neighborhoods for personal profit.

Working on-site today instead of from home. Hopefully, I’ll be in a better mood tomorrow.

I’m pretty sure I passed 50K over the weekend for the March Literary Challenge, but I won’t have actual numbers until tomorrow.

Devon

b>Devon’s Bookstore:


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

Published in: on March 17, 2008 at 6:48 am  Comments (6)  

Friday, March 7, 2008

Friday, March 7, 2008
New Moon
Saturn Retrograde
Cloudy and cooler

Couldn’t comment on anyone’s Blogger blogs yesterday. According to them, neither my WordPress nor my Live Journal ID were valid. You know where they can shove that!

The drilling right outside my door all day nearly drove me over the edge. Not to mention the poor cats nearly turned themselves inside out. If I could have given them tiny earplugs, I would have! I worked on Tracking Medusa in the kitchen, with the MP3 player turned unhealthily up, but that was the only way I could shut out enough to get ANY work done. I can’t work at the computer because it’s too close to where the work happens.

The scumbags are not giving us appropriate notice, they are not making appointments, and I bet you they actually think if they force a physical confrontation, I will back down. Silly scumbags.

Tori brought up a good point about New Amsterdam. The Native Americans that lived in this area of New York did not live in tipis (yes, that is the correct spelling). The Lenape (also known as Delaware), some of whom lived on the island of Manhattan, built bark longhouses or oval houses. If I remember the Montauk & Shinnecock correctly (they were in the area and onto Long Island), they didn’t use tipis, either. I’d have to check with National Museum of the American Indian to be sure, and I don’t know that I want to take the time, since this is not my project – but I’d guess maybe they DON’T have an historical consultant on the show after all! I liked last night’s episode, for the most part. It was a moving depiction of race relations in New York in the 1940s, and the family revelations were interesting. Very European to reveal them this early in the series and not wait 8 or 9 episodes. The meaning of all the names, first and last, in the piece, is something I also like, although it is a bit heavy-handed at times. But because they broke my trust in the first episode, I wondered how well they’d researched the hospital situation where Lily had her baby. The art decoration on John’s office in the Chrysler Building was gorgeous, though. I’m not sure it was accurate, but it was gorgeous. It’s now obvious that they mystery/detective/job elements of his life are the B storyline are, but they still need to be plotted more clearly and tightly, and we need to have a little bit of actual mystery in it. One could tell that the killer was the killer the first time the killer came onscreen. Too easy and too obvious. So, I still have mixed feelings about the show, although I’m willing to watch a few more episodes before making a final decision. The conceit of the show falls along some of the same lines I believe – we all have one true soul mate, but there are several people with whom we can be content or even happy. But what I wonder is if this doctor chick is “The” one, and John ages and dies – that’s a pretty lousy thing to do to the person you love and who loves you. If you love someone that much, you don’t want to lose the person, and John ignores that part of the equation so far. Since he has loved and been loved in the past, you’d think he would have a clue after 400 years. His learning curve is good in every other area; I’m assuming the reasoning is that he’s obsessed and can’t see straight in this particular area of his life.

Another show I started watching on and off is Stargate Atlantis (thanks, Imp!) I caught a few bits here and there and actually saw part of a repeat of the series premiere. The show makes me laugh. I think the ensemble’s very good and it balances action, humor, and humanity pretty well, in the bits I’ve seen. And Joe Flanigan, who plays Sheppard, just makes me laugh. Talk about perfect casting. When you find the absolute right actor for the role, everything else falls into place. He knows when to be goofy, when to be serious, when Sheppard is on the job he exudes capability, yet thinks out of the box, he’s very focused, and just nails the character. I sure wouldn’t want to date Col. Sheppard (too high maintenance for me), but I’d like him at my side or at my back in a bad situation. Flanigan’s light touch makes you give a damn, and he’s another one of those actors where you don’t seem him work at it — he simply IS. It’s one of the best gifts an actor can give an audience (or a writer)!

After a day of writing and editing my own work, it’s fun to break down other people’s writing in shows. Also, because I’ve worked on sets, I can sort out the different hands in the pot a good deal of the time, especially since I know some of the directors’ styles now, etc. I couldn’t imagine being a show runner on something like Stargate or even Lost – the amount of information one has to keep track of is stunning, and it keeps morphing, so you have to keep up, and you have to keep adjusting scripts as new information about the worlds and characters is filled in. Inconsistencies jump out more readily in alternate universes. Many people think they’re easier to hide in “made up worlds”, but they’re not. Because you’re teaching the audience (or, in a book, the readership) the world, inconsistencies hit in a much more tangible way. It’s interesting.

I better try to grab a few minutes on the computer before the chaos begins again. We’re getting another storm and are on flood watch again through tomorrow afternoon. The car’s still safe over in the next town, so I have less to worry about, but with the building chaos and constant flood concerns – I’m a little tired.

Devon

Devon’s Bookstore:


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

Thursday, March 6, 2008

Thursday, March 06, 2008
Dark Moon
Saturn Retrograde
Sunny and mild

We never got the second bad storm yesterday, so the brook held, and there was no flooding here. It was pretty bad a bit farther upstate, around New Paltz, but we, fortunately, dodged a bullet.

Unfortunately, I woke up this morning to the news that someone tossed a bomb at the Army Recruiting Station in Times Square, so there’s quite a bit of chaos going on. As far as they know, no one was hurt (it happened around 4 AM). But everyone’s still on edge.

Good day’s work yesterday. I got a nice chunk of Tracking Medusa done and into the computer. I got out two large projects on submission – had to reformat one of them, which was a pain in the . . . .I’m getting a little tired of every publication slightly altering format guidelines just to test and see if you read them. There’s a reason “standard manuscript format” was created – so that there’s a standard. If we’re supposed to honor that, those on the other side of the table should honor it as well. Put a trick question in the cover letter or something – but keep standard manuscript format.

Great day’s work on the sci-fi horror western. The flashback’s gone in a completely different direction, which still supports my original vision of the piece, but changes the structure and style a bit. It works, I like it, it pushes my buttons, and I have problems with writing some of it because of the “ick” factor – there’s a reason I don’t usually write horror and read very little of it. But it’s a breakthrough, and I’m starting to think I can finish the first draft within a week and then hit the edits.

Slow morning on Old-Fashioned Detective Work. I need to answer some plot questions for myself, plus research the interior of cabin cruisers and do some research on glass-blowing before I can go any farther. And I’m so close to the end – but I need to get this right.

I’m trying to get used to the building crap and just work. Not easy, but as long as they follow the law and don’t attempt entry without a prior appointment, I can deal. I have to go grocery shopping (running out of cat food again), and it’s such a nice day, I just might take a walk on the beach.

I even got to read a book yesterday just because I wanted to, not because I had to. It’s Lauren Willig’s The Secret History of the Pink Carnation, and, so far, I’m enjoying it enormously.

Better get back to work.

Devon

Old-Fashioned Detective Work – 23,729 words out of est. 25,000 (94.9%)

Sci-Fi Horror Western – 4,893 words out of 15,000 (32.6%)

March Writing Challenge — 11,398 words out of 50,000 (22.7%)

Devon’s Bookstore:


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

Published in: on March 6, 2008 at 9:06 am  Comments (5)  

Friday, February 15, 2008

Friday, February 15, 2008
Waxing Moon
Saturn Retrograde
Mercury Retrograde
Cloudy and cold

Whew! Busy day yesterday. I polished and sent off three guest blog posts; did a fact sheet for a client; did some internet research; negotiated with a few publications; trolled the job sites and actually found a few potential clients; worked on the synopsis and outline; started reading my friend’s novel; enjoyed a Valentine’s afternoon distraction; went in to work a show on a track I’ve never run or followed.

I am on my last ink tank. Again! I’ve already spent more on ink for the new printer than it would have cost to fix the old one.

My shoulder hurt like hell and was a major problem. Not quite sure why.

Saw a call for submissions, for an anthology for charity. Every once in awhile, I do one of these, especially if it’s a cause in which I believe. I liked this one’s purpose. However, a condition of SUBMISSION (not acceptance, submission) was to promote the anthology and buy a copy. Um, no. When I’m willing to do an in-kind donation that’s worth several hundred dollars, you don’t expect me to do your marketing and be one of your customers, charity or not. Next!

The show was fine. I dressed the men and one of the principal men; they’re all very sweet. I enjoy them both as actors and people, which is always fun. The notes were clear, a friend who’s done the track was there to answer questions, so it was all good.

Came home, had a snack, checked my email, and was exhausted, so I went to bed around 1 AM.

I have to go to the bank this morning and then finish packing my writing bag. I’m working out of town this weekend – what’s great is that there’s no cell service, no internet access, nothing – in and around what I need to do for the job, I have nearly three days to write, read, do yoga, and meditate.

I plan to finish Old-Fashioned Detective Work, get a big chunk of work done on the sci-fi horror novella, work on the next ebook, sort out some other projects, and finish reading my friend’s novel (which I love). Before I go, I have to write the fix for the logic lapse in Medusa and get that out. And I’d like to get out a couple of other pitches and submissions.

Not much to say — part of me’s already left!

“Talk” when I get back – have a good holiday weekend, everyone!

Devon

Devon’s Bookstore:


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

Published in: on February 15, 2008 at 9:14 am  Comments (8)  

Wednesday, January 23, 2008

Wednesday, January 23, 2008
Waning Moon
Mars Retrograde
Saturn Retrograde
Sunny and mild

Congratulations to Viggo Mortensen for the Oscar nomination for his work in Eastern Promises, and to Tilda Swinton for her work in Michael Clayton. Both of them are performers whose work is detailed, exquisite, and fascinating. They can lift up a mediocre piece of work and take an excellent piece of work to new heights. About damn time their work is noticed in a way that can open even more doors for them. The Art Direction category is one of the most interesting this year, with American Gangster, Atonement, The Golden Compass, Sweeney Todd, and There Will Be Blood in the running, each of which creates an extraordinary visual world. My pick for best editing is Bourne Ultamatum, whose editing I thought was astonishingly good.

On the flip side of that, I was shocked and saddened by Heath Ledgar’s death yesterday, here in NY. I never worked with him, so there’s that degree of separation from it, but he was on the list of people I hoped to work with someday. It’s a huge loss to the creative community, in addition to the sorrow it brings his family. I know that building in Soho well – I’ve been to parties there over the years. The situation is just . . .sad.

I forgot to mention that the new issue of The Scruffy Dog Review is out, which means a new installment of “The Literary Athlete” is included. It’s still in the “To Market, To Market” series, but this time, it talks about the importance of researching your markets BEFORE you send them. You can find the article here:

I spent far too much time on the computer yesterday, floating around, and off the computer, dithering. It’s one thing to need percolation time; it’s another to dither. And I was dithering.

I did manage to start the next assignment for Confidential Job #1, though. Sooner I do it, sooner I can send the invoice!

I’m also tracking down some other owed money. Problem Client still hasn’t paid (gee, what a surprise), and two other publications owe me money for material, one from last October and one from last AUGUST. I’ve already put in requests; time to put in a less diplomatic one. If a publications’s in financial difficulty and they need to work something out, it’s fine. We’ll discuss it and work it out. But to publish the work and then ignore the invoices and follow-ups – uh, no. Not cool at all. And typical of the life of a freelancer. While most business writing does pay a portion upfront, most magazines that take articles do not. They pay according to their contract (which is usually on acceptance or on publication) and/or a kill fee.

Worked on chapters 12, 13 & 14 of Tracking Medusa. Cut the references to The Thistle Chapel in St. Giles Cathedral – it’s not relevant to the story and bogged it down. Re-structured the scene inside The Oxford Bar. Did some work on the confrontation with Karl outside the Oxford Bar, but I’m not satisfied with it. Re-worked it some more, and it’s better. Cut repetitive references to previous conversations stuck in because there was a time lapse in the writing of the draft and I forgot I already said it. The hardest was re-structuring the information they discover at the Scottish War Memorial, why it’s such a shock to Gwen, and the chronology of information. I have to remind myself we’re not in the 1980s, so I need an extra familial generation for the physicality of what happens where and who does what to whom to make sense. I had to do math, for crying out loud – how old was this one or that one in which year, and what could he have physically done? I also have to go back and tweak something in the Lindisfarne section that affects this section.

It’s an interesting contrast here, how Justin handles a situation according to his conscience and integrity, balancing what he knows is right with what he wants, compared to how he’ll deal with a similar situation in Book 3, with a very different result.

Hopefully, the creation and explanation of the amulets section doesn’t sound like “Gems and Crystals 101.” It’s very interactive, there’s humor, and also Justin’s growing concern that Gwen’s lost it.

And, of course, the warring voices saying, “You can’t fix this; it’s a mess” to “Just go ahead and fix it already!”, “Who do you think you are, trying to write?” to “I’m a writer, dammit, I’m writing.”

All you can do is keep at it, right?

But I felt like I was banging my head on the desk to no avail yesterday.

Hey, guess what? I had to put in a new ink tank. Are you surprised? Not!

Off to work on Wyatt, and then I have errands to run and practical stuff to handle. I also have to sit down and sort through some offers to figure out which make the best sense, both financially and creatively. Of course, the ones I find most attractive are the ones it makes the least business sense to accept, so I’m trying to find a balance.

Devon

Tracking Medusa revision – 42,014 words out of est. 90,000 (46.7%)

Devon’s Bookstore:


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

Published in: on January 23, 2008 at 9:01 am  Comments (8)  

Monday, January 21, 2008

Monday, January 21, 2008
Waxing Moon
Mars Retrograde
Saturn Retrograde
Martin Luther King Day
Sunny and cold

Let us take time today to remember that each of us is personally responsible for turning Martin Luther King’s dream into a reality.

I was looking at job listings yesterday on a site that carries high-paying jobs. One, located not to far from me, made me burst out laughing. It’s a job writing reports on how the company can write better reports. Is that a waste of everybody’s time or what? I’m not applying for it because the temptation to write smart-ass reports on the reports would be too much for me. I couldn’t keep a straight face, much less a diplomatic pen.

I found a couple of interesting-sounding jobs and will put together proposal packages. They require more thought than the regular pitch w/samples – their needs are more intricate, and I need to figure out a unique position for myself in each. Should I land any of them, even on an intermittent basis, the money would be great, and I think the work would be both interesting and challenging. In any case, I’m opening more contacts, and, if I follow up properly, work will come along in the next few months. One job is in MA,. one in VT, and one in RI, so it would be interesting.

I turn on the HP and there’s a message from the company, wanting me to agree to participate in a program where some office overseas monitors my printer use. I don’t think so. “Decline”. If I could have given them the virtual finger, I would have. If they want me to fill out a survey, that’s one thing – but to hook into my computer/printer and MONITOR my use? No way! Especially if they’re not giving me something like 600 free ink tanks!

Yes, I had to put in a new ink tank AGAIN.

Had a quiet day in the cold. For once, the building kept on the heat all day; usually, they shut it off between 9 AM – 4 PM because “no one’s home then.” In other words, children, the elderly, and anyone who might work at home doesn’t matter. They even kept the heat on overnight. Will wonders never cease? The state must have threatened them with a fine.

Finished the manuscript I had to critique for a colleague. It’s really quite wonderful, extraordinary, and unique. I hope it finds a home SOON – it’s terrific. I caught a few inconsistencies, and there are a few places where I think it might receive criticism, but I think the author should hold his ground. What a joy to read something that good!

Read the very first of Donna Leon’s mysteries set in Venice. I love them – the writing’s wonderful, the atmosphere is great, and they always surprise me. They’re also always eating and drinking, which means I’m starving when I read them! 😉

I’m currently annoyed at the NYC Ballet. Tickets for a dress rehearsal were offered starting at 9 AM. I put in my request for the 31st and cannot get a confirmation – all I get are site errors. In other words, the site can’t handle the traffic. So I blew my morning writing – because I got on the site BEFORE I did my first words of the day – and can’t even get the frigging tickets. If your site can’t handle the traffic, don’t advertise in the NY TIMES! And then the site crashed completely, so forget it.

Tried to watch the Jane Austen thing last night, but they all whined too much, so I turned it off.

Okay, now that the ballet site crashed completely, maybe I can go back to work and get something done.

Erin, thanks for that lead. I’ll contact the mag today.

I started seeing some interesting connections in the third Gwen/Justin – patterns in the characters’ behaviour. I’m not going to plant flags over it, but it’ll be there, and it’ll be interesting to see how much people pick up on. Most readers, I find, pick up on quite a bit, sometimes even more than the writer realized was going on during the writing process.

It’s a holiday for many, but I need to get going. I’ve got to go out into the cold today to Staples (AGAIN) – I’m out of paper and need more binders and another crate. And I might bake a chocolate sour cream cake.

But first – to write.

Devon

Published in: on January 21, 2008 at 9:39 am  Comments (11)  

Monday, January 14, 2008

Monday, January 14, 2008
Waxing Moon
Mars Retrograde
Saturn Retrograde
Cloudy and cold

So where’s this huge storm they talked about? There’s been barely a dusting of snow around here!

I did some work yesterday morning, got everything ready to leave, and headed for the demon bus in the early afternoon. It actually worked, and was mostly a pleasant ride. I put on my headphones and listened to my music, while doing the work for Confidential Job #1. It was beautifully rendered, but heartbreaking, and will be difficult to write up. We got to the city, I hauled my luggage uphill back to Grand Central – people don’t realize that Manhattan is not flat, and there’s quite a rise from 33rd – 36th Streets. Got on the train, and I was home a little after 6:30. It takes me almost as long to get between here and Manhattan as it does between Manhattan and Philly.

Played with the cats, who were very glad to see me and had to tell me EVERYTHING that happened while I was gone. Did a whole lot of nothing at night; didn’t even unpack.

And that’s what I’m doing today. A whole lot of nothing. I’ve given myself the day off. Other than a trip to the bank and writing up the material that’s due today for Confidential Job #1, I am going to do exactly as I please. If I feel like writing, I will; if I don’t, I won’t. There’s plenty of reading that needs my attention – I’m partially through Class Dis-mythed, and I started Sharon Shinn’s Mystic and Rider, which is enthralling from page 1. I’ve got another manuscript to critique, and the next batch of material for Confidential Job #2. I’ve got plenty of writing to do – and I completely forgot that I have to work on the time travel novella. And there’s editing and all the rest. And a book of essays written by archaeologists in the field that I thought would be good background material for the next two Gwen/Justin books, since, instead of traveling with them in a chase, we’re actually out in the field with them. I also had a very odd dream that felt unusually real the other night. I think it will make a good basis for a story, eventually, but I have to figure it out. It wasn’t bad or frightening or anything . . .it was just odd.

But right now, there’s too much information roiling around in my head, and I have to give it time to sort itself out. If I try to force it, it will get more muddled. If I let it unravel itself slowly through some quiet time, I’ll be ready to get back to the page more quickly, and I’ll be more productive once I get there.

Devon

Published in: on January 14, 2008 at 8:48 am  Comments (9)  

Saturday, December 22, 2007

Saturday, December 22, 2007
Waxing Moon
Yule/Winter Solstice
Mars Retrograde
Saturn Retrograde
Cloudy and cold

I managed to get everything done in the city fairly quickly. The ride in was a nightmare, due to more badly behaved children whining and screaming for the entire 50 minute trip. Everyone in the car was ready to throw the parents under the train. In addition, the parents just kept shoving doughnuts into the kids’ mouths to try and shut them up. Yeah, that’s what a cranky four year old needs – more sugar! Could we license parents, please? I mean, come on!

Grand Central Station was already a zoo by 10 AM. Plenty of people either took the day off or left early to begin their travels. I fought my way through the crowds, and went over to the 30s on 6th Avenue, looking for chains. Well, I’d have to buy it by the foot and put my own clasps, etc. on it, and I don’t really know how to do that. I could learn, but don’t want to take the time right now. The store personnel’s English wasn’t good enough to understand what I asked, and my Korean is non-existent, and it’s not that important right now, so I bagged it.

Headed up to the credit union, took care of business. Headed to the theatre to pick up a check that wasn’t there, but some phone calls tracked it down at the office, so I picked I up at the office and got it to the other bank, then headed to the Borders at 57th & Park to look for a few things. Found some, didn’t find others, but trekked back to Grand Central. By then, I’d walked the equivalent of 5 miles and I was losing momentum! It was like one of those filmed dream sequences, where you run and run and the destination keeps getting farther away instead of closer!

Managed to catch the 12:37 train back out – it was packed and I drank a vile cup of cocoa on the train, unfortunately. They were giving out free NY Post newspapers and I figured, hey, I’m getting a little short on cat litter, so why not? Because, in my opinion, that’s all it’s good for.

Can’t remember what I did in the afternoon. I know I was tired. I know my back’s bothering me, although there’s no good reason for it to do so. Oh, yeah, dealt with more building crap, which is probably why my back hurts. Worked on the menu for the Eve and Day. Wrote up the grocery list. Worked on the Christmas story.

Just when you think you’re done, there are ten more errands that turn up, so that’s what I’ll be doing today. The weather is supposed to be icky tomorrow, so I only want to have to go out and get the paper.

And, of course, tonight is the Yule celebration. Okay, so the Solstice was actually at 1:08 this morning, but I was in bed, and I’ll celebrate it tonight!

Decent morning’s work on Earth Bride. I finished the wedding ceremony. If I can handle the reception and all the deceptions going on there in one chapter and the wedding night in another chapter, I’ve got this third section of the book finished. The fourth section opens eighteen months later, and then the fifth is when Niki returns to earth. I’m definitely going way over 120K. I’m trying to choke the internal editor. Because she really is getting on my last nerve! Even if she’s right.

Have a great weekend leading into the holidays!

Devon

Earth Bride – 115,782 words out of est. 120,000

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
115 / 120
(95.8%)

Devon’s Bookstore:


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

Published in: on December 22, 2007 at 8:12 am  Comments (3)  

Tuesday, November 20, 2007

Tuesday, November 20, 2007
Waxing Moon
Mars Retrograde
Rainy and mild

I feel rather lost without Gwen and Justin, although the first chapter of Book 2 is already writing itself in my head. I finally unlocked the key to this one’s structure, which is helpful, and can now do a truly detailed Writer’s Rough. We get to see Justin’s dark side in this one, which will also be kind of fun. And see how he does or does not come to terms with it.

Worked on material for Confidential Job #1 yesterday afternoon, and ran some errands. Didn’t do much in the evening other than work out.

My computer had a freak-out and I nearly matched it – there was a point where it claimed not to have a hard drive – but we seem to have negotiated a truce, at least for the moment, and I did a restore that seems to have worked.

I found a book on the Greenwich Library discard shelf for 50 cents – a hardback needed for research that I’d nearly ordered from Amazon for $17 earlier in the day, but decided to wait. I love when that happens!

I had a nice morning’s work on Earth Bride. I’ve deviated a bit from the outline, but it’s important to the overall story, and I’ve uncovered a rather disturbing flaw in Niki’s about-to-be husband. But it makes the story richer, so it’s all good.

I might have to go to the city to go to the union office or I might not, if my supervisors didn’t include me in the paperwork. I’m waiting to hear from the union, because I don’t want to make a three hour round trip to the city for nothing.

I have plenty of other errands to do today, and I need to pack. I’m off to Maine tomorrow for the holiday – I’ll check back in when I return. Have a wonderful week!

Devon

Earth Bride – 65,988 words out of 50,000 (Nano goal)

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
65 / 50
(130.0%)

Earth Bride – 65,988 out of 100,000 (completion goal)

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
65 / 100
(65.0%)

Friday, November 16, 2007

Friday, November 16, 2007
Waxing Moon
Sunny and cold

Yesterday was a tiring day. I got into the city, I ran my errands in record time (even though I dawdled). I picked up books by Sharon Shinn and Stephanie Barron that look interesting. I had a drink at the Algonquin and made notes on Earth Bride. I visited picket lines and offered support.

The union meeting was packed, which is a good thing. I got to catch up with a lot of people I hadn’t seen for ages. I only stayed for part of the meeting – there was some good information; but, unfortunately, because it’s a democratic set-up where anyone who wishes to speak can be heard, too many decide to use public meeting time for personal counseling, instead of setting up private meetings with the appropriate representative. And that gets annoying.

Costume Imp and I then went to Bar X for a drink and a snack; quite a few of our colleagues drifted in over time, and another friend joined us.

I caught an evening train home and didn’t get much done.

I have to revise an article today, do a report for Confidential Job #1, and start negotiations with one of the potential clients who responded to a pitch made day before yesterday. I cut ties with another client who wasn’t worth the time or energy – this was NOT a nice person, and a complete energy vampire. I tried both diplomatically and bluntly to remind the client of the parameters we set in the contract, but it was ignored. So I finished the assignment and ended the relationship. The pay wasn’t high enough to warrant the unhappiness.

Slow morning on Earth Bride. It’s a series of scenes necessary to set up Niki’s growth in this section, and conflict in coming chapters. They’re a little more awkward than I would like, but oh, well.

Off to email the N3s and then get back to work. I have to make up for the work I didn’t get done on Tracking Medusa yesterday, too.

Sue asked for ideas for her trip to New York. Here are some of my favorites:

If you’re here during the holiday season, head up to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, go the Medieval Hall, and experience the Angel Tree. It is one of the most magnificent experiences you will have in New York – the carvings and artwork are stunningly beautiful.

The Empire State Building at twilight – go up there, watch the sun set and watch the lights come up over Manhattan.

The Lower East Side Tenement Museum – the docents are amazing. They’ve re-created the apartments with the actual belongings of families who lived there, and tell you their stories.

The Algonquin Hotel – sit in the lobby and have a drink. They make fantastic classic cocktails and have an extensive menu of their house drinks. I think they make the best sidecars I’ve ever tasted.

Central Park – it’s an amazing oasis in the city, with walkways, boating, skating, the Zoo, and more.

New York Historical Society – right next to the Museum of Natural History on the Upper West Side. Terrific exhibits. Great staff.

NY Rangers Game at Madison Square Garden – even if you’re not a hockey fan, there’s nothing like seeing a game in the Garden!

Restaurants: Of course I’m going blank. I usually eat in midtown, between shows. Restaurants come and go quickly in this town. Some of my favorites are:
Maison – 7th Avenue at 53rd St. (French)
Whym – 9th Avenue – I think it’s between 55th & 56th, but it might be between 56th & 57th.
Gallagher’s Steak House – W. 52nd St., just west of Broadway. If Leo’s tending bar, ask him to make you a hot whisky toddy.
Ocean Grill – 384 Columbus Ave. at W. 78 St. – one of my favorites, right near the Museum of Natural History.
Further downtown, the Village, etc.:
The Cedar Tavern – this is near NYU and near Strand Books. Its former location was a Jack Kerouac/beat hangout. The food and drinks are great here. University Place and 12th St.
Peculiar Pub – 145 Bleecker St. – over 400 beers from all over the world.
Café Loup – 105 W. 13th St. Upscale bistro.
Café Espanol – 172 Bleecker St. Great food, great wine list.
Cornelia St. Café – 29 Cornelia St. Great food.
Grey Dog Café – Carmine St., just south of Bleecker. Excellent, healthy sandwiches, wraps, etc. and, of course, good coffee.
Telephone Bar and Grill – 149 Second Avenue, between 9th and 10th Streets – a British bistro, great food, great drinks, great atmosphere.
Cloister Café – 238 E. 9th Street, between 2nd and 3rd Avneues. Stained glass windows, good food, lovely garden.
Velselka Café – 144 2nd Avenue, open 24 hours. Great borscht, great desserts, and muffins.
The Minetta Lane – corner of Thompson or maybe it’s MacDougal, and Minetta Lane. Great food, emphasis on Italian.
Pretty much any restaurant in Little Italy.


Music/Theatre Venues
that usually have something good going on:
The Knitting Factory — 74 Leonard St., just off Church.
Joe’s Pub – part of the Public Theatre at 425 Lafayette St.
The Blue Note – 131 W. 3rd St. –jazz with great Sunday brunches. Make reservations, though!
The Bitter End – 147 Bleecker St. You can just walk up and down Bleecker and find about a dozen bars with music.

That should give you a starting point!

Devon

Earth Bride – 57,506 words out of 50,000 words (Nano goal)

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
57 / 50
(114.0%)

Earth Bride – 57,506 words out of 100,000 words (completion goal)

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
57 / 100
(57.0%)

Free eBook: 30 Tips for 30 Days: Kick-Start Your Novel and Get Out of Your Own Way. A Nano Guide. Available for free download here.

Published in: on November 16, 2007 at 9:38 am  Comments (6)  

October 12, 2007

October 12, 2007
Waxing Moon
Mercury Retrograde
No idea; it’s still dark, it’s about 1:30 in the morning

So, it wasn’t even retrograde yesterday and I was already f—ked!

One of the publications, for whom I turned out quite a few articles in the past few weeks is now saying that I “misunderstood” the rate and it’s really less. Um, no, we talked about the rate and I was never told that different articles were paid at different rates or I would have said “no.” I want my money, and I don’t want to work for them again. Or, if I do, we renegotiate terms, and that’s what I told them. It’s a shame, because it was a fun gig. But, had the rate they want to pay me been the rate in the ad, I wouldn’t have even bothered to answer it.

By the time I got home, there were promises to pay, and a line saying, “If we don’t use you for January, February, or March, it’s not personal; we’re trying to cut costs.” Uh, if you don’t meet my terms, you won’t be using me those months or any others, because I’m not doing the work! Some always try to get in the last word, you know?

So goes the life of a freelance writer.

And it always feels like such a body blow when they try to screw you. So you have to step back, take a deep breath, remind yourself it’s business and respond in kind.

I’m in the process of adopting Nano Newbies for November. Shall I call them N3s? I figured, fuck it, I want to do Nano again, I enjoy working with the newbies, if I have to bag it to move, then that’s what I do, but why cut myself off from it before I know what November will bring? It will bring freedom in some areas, stresses in others, but why assume Nano’s a no-go?

And then I went to the train to begin my trip to the theatre and my life turned into something out of a Janet Evanovich novel.

First of all, it was pouring rain. I had to move the car, because the street was already flooding, although the brook held. Then, I’m standing there on the platform, in my long black trench, looking like a reject from The Lost Boys, waiting for my late train, wallowing in “poor me-isms”. The train from NYC pulls up on the other platform. I see Mr. Chivalry get off, from the other day – the guy who lent me his suit jacket when I was cold. He spotted me and started across the overpass to my side of the train tracks. My train pulled up. I got on; he sprinted the last part of the way, down the steps, and got on the train, sitting next to me! I was surprised, to say the least.

We’ve barely pulled out of the station, and a face pops up from the seat in front – narrow little face framed in curly brown hair with big brown eyes. For a minute, I thought it was an elf, but in reality, it was a 14 year old boy who said, “I know you.”

“Yeah, right.”

He told me my name, and then he said, “You went to school with my dad.”

“Who’s your dad?”

He told me, and it was a guy I’d gone to school with, in both elementary and high school. “He had a really big crush on you.”

“No, he didn’t.”

“He did.”

“Trust me. I was there. He didn’t.”

“He has a scrapbook of your writing, all the way back to when you wrote for The Chronicle and Garnet and Black.”

(The former was the local paper; the latter the high school paper, both of which contained my articles).

I found this a little weird, to say the least. And then the kid’s going, “And I read your stuff, too, especially about horses.”

“You don’t even know the names I use.”

“Do so.” And he reeled off about half of them. I’d have been really embarrassed if he’d known any of the erotica ones! Then he says, “You have to be my godmother.”

“What?”

“I’m fourteen. My dad’s divorced and my mom’s not around. I’m at the age where I need a strong female role model in my life.”

“I could so kick your ass.”

“I know. That’s why you’re a great role model.”

“You are so full of it.” But I have to admit, he was pretty funny.

Then, he launches into a whole social justice monologue – that seems to be his passion in life. He got off a few stops down, still chattering a mile a minute.

Meanwhile, Mr. Chivalry’s watching all this like we’re some weird sort of science experiment. Then, Mr. Chivalry and I finally get to talk without the interruption of a teenaged elf boy. He’s at a personal crossroads; I’m at so many crossroads there aren’t even signposts. I told him to trust his gut. His head and heart will take him on the most complicated path, but his gut will steer him true.

So we get to Grand Central Station, and, thanks to my Lost Boys trench, I’m pulled over to get my bag searched (but I got to play with the bomb-sniffing dog). And they pull my huge pliers out of my bag and want to know why I’m carrying them around.

“I dress flying monkeys for a living.”

“What?”

I spoke very slowly and clearly, as though I was speaking to the intellectually challenged. “I. Dress. Flying Monkeys. For a living.”

“Uh –“

Meanwhile, the bomb-sniffing dog is wagging his tail and gazing at me adoringly. So they let me go.

We get out of the station and there are film trucks all over, and it turns out I know one of the actors from something else I worked on a couple of years ago, and we joke around for a bit until we go on our merry way. Meanwhile, Mr. Chivalry’s looking at me like I’m some sort of space alien and I say, “Welcome to my freaking life.”

Somehow, even though he has my number, I seriously doubt I’ll be hearing from him.

I was exhausted before I ever reached the theatre.

Got to the show, got through the show, and that’s all I have to say about that. I was trailing, but it’s not with the actor with whom I’ll actually work next week, so there will be plenty I don’t know. Whatever. Costume Imp gave me a thorough talking-to the other day and he’s right, and it’s helped clarify some things. Kick a few signposts, so to speak.

I missed the 11:10 train by ONE MINUTE – Mercury Retrograde – so I got home much later than I wanted, but, oh well.

I have to work on conference stuff today, and maybe, just maybe, get the Samhain decorations up. I bought a pumpkin the other day. Now I have to decorate it.

Downstairs Neighbor’s back to running the television at full blast all night long. If I was a different type of person, I’d cut his cable line.

Hmm, the Loving Kindness Meditation doesn’t seem to be working. You think?

Let’s just say I’ve upgraded from depression to melancholy.

I’m going to try to get some sleep now, and get up early enough to get things done later today.

Devon