Monday, July 28, 2008

Monday, July 28, 2008
Waning Moon
Pluto Retrograde
Jupiter Retrograde
Neptune Retrograde
Cloudy and sticky

Woke up exhausted. The past three weeks caught up with me. Got a slow start this morning. Tomorrow, I’ll have to do things like go through the mail I haven’t opened in three weeks and pay some bills.

I’m already missing my actors; I’ve been lucky to be in a positive (mostly) environment for the past few weeks with people I care about. Not being there regularly will leave a hole in my life. However, we’re all scattering to follow our paths, and, again, it’s about trusting in the bonds created.

Revising REAL is like watching an episode of the TWILIGHT ZONE. Things I wrote about as fiction a year and a half ago have actually happened in life much the way I wrote about them in the book. Now the dilemma becomes do I change that and re-fictionalize it, or do I keep it in, even though it’s too close to the bone for my comfort? I have to sit back and ask, “What serves the story best?” and follow it from there. But it’s a little disconcerting.

I ordered some CDs put out by friends; I need new music for the next few months. Also, since some of them are by people I worked with on the show, it’s a way of keeping them close.

I have to figure out what I’m going to do about the promotional stuff for HEX BREAKER, and now that the cover art is final and the edits approved (less than a week before release), I have to get back on track with promotion.

This will be a busy week. I need to re-gather my energy and focus it on the launch and on the other writing that needs to be done.

I’d like another day off to just “be”, but that’s not an option.

Off to catch a train for day work.

Devon

Devon’s Bookstore:


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

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Published in: on July 28, 2008 at 8:12 am  Comments (2)  

Wednesday, July 16, 2008

Wednesday, July 16, 2008
Waxing Moon
Pluto Retrograde
Jupiter Retrograde
Neptune Retrograde
Hot and humid

I got the article done and hit “send” about five minutes before I had to leave for the theatre. Not my best work.

Cover art discussions back and forth all day. My original vision is very different, but we’ve come to an agreement and will run with it. And Billy is not included in the cover, which is a disappointment – I feel all three of the main characters are important, but they want the focus on Jain and Wyatt.

Show was fine. Everyone’s dealing with the transition in their own way, and you just have to give them a lot of room. The actors coming in are trailing to learn the backstage as well as onstage maneuvering, so it’s pretty crowded. But it’s fine. It will be a long week, but it will all be good.

I’m going to try to get a little bit of writing done before I have to leave for the show – another two show, 14-hour day for me. Tomorrow, I have a bit of a break during the day, but Friday, we put in the new cast, so it’s another 14 hour day, and Saturday, I have to be at the theatre at 8 AM for a photo call and then do two shows, so, for me, including the commute, Saturday is an 18 hour day (6 AM – midnight). But it will be fine. The hours are long, but the people are pleasant, which makes up for a lot. Saturday will be intense, because it’s the last day for five cast members, but it is what it is. This is a transitional business – everything changes.

This week, my life is about the show, not about my own work, although I’m trying to keep somewhat of a balance. I have a lot of opportunities opening up for me, and I want to make decisions that are smart both on a creative level and a business level.

Devon

Published in: on July 16, 2008 at 8:30 am  Comments (5)  
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Wednesday, May 28, 2008

Wednesday, May 28, 2008
Waning Moon
Pluto Retrograde
Jupiter Retrograde
Sunny and warm

So, before I left for the photo call at 11 AM yesterday, I’d worked on the adaptation, done another polish on THE MATILDA MURDERS, prepared it and the cover letter, sent it off, typed off my notes for Confidential Job #2, sent if off with invoice, and repacked my set bag for the photo shoot.

Pant, pant, pant. I’d put in a day’s work before I even got started with the “official” day’s work!

Train was late – as usual – but I’d left for an early enough train to take that into consideration. Got to the theatre, we waited for the car service, we packed the car – the driver couldn’t figure out how to get the ironing boarding the back – what, does Momma still do the shirts? Anyway, we got down to Chelsea without a problem. The studio was hot and stuffy, but we managed. We were prepped lickety split and the shoot started. A few minor glitches (okay, I pitched a fit at one point when it was necessary and stopped the shoot to make an adjustment on a costume – Topstick is the BEST invention known to man – or woman).

After the shoot, there was a point where I had the large garment bag of costumes slung over one arm and I’m carrying the ironing board, standing on the curb on W. 23 St. of New York City as my colleague’s hailing a cab, and one of the actors and I just looked at each other and started laughing. Welcome to my world!

Got back to the theatre (after wrestling the ironing board into the trunk of a yellow cab), redistributed everything to be prepped for the show, and I grabbed a salad for dinner.

Show was fine – I was with the women this evening rather than the men, but got confused at two points and thought I missed cues, but they were from the other track. Everything was fine. Nothing got missed, nobody died, show was fine, so it’s all good. It’s a really good group of people on the show, and that always makes it pleasant.

Got home late, checked email. Peter Bowerman’s using a quote from me on “Aggravation Fees” in his next WELL-FED WRITER newsletter. Confidential Job #2 already paid me for the work I sent in yesterday morning. And a publisher gave me an offer for HEX BREAKER. I’m going to go over the contract again – the first pass looked pretty sane. And I’ll have the lawyer look at it. I’ll let you know when all i’s are dotted and t’s are crossed. But it looks as though HEX BREAKER found a home.

I have to take a few days and think things through before doing more work on the adaptation. I’m at a critical series of scenes – it’s the big confrontation between the female protagonist and the antagonist, where the male protagonist learns the complicated history and why there’s a confrontation. If it seems early in the book for this to happen, well, when I flesh out some of the earlier scenes, it’ll be about 10-20K later in the book, I think, and then there’s a twist later on (that’s not in the screenplay, by the way) that will make sense for it to happen here.

However, I’ve been splitting action between the several factions of the protagonist group. Here, I’m not sure if I should have this action unbroken, or go back to what’s happening simultaneously, and then come back to this action for the big finale of the section. I’m worried that using a technique similar to cross-cutting in film will dilute the action and power in this scene; at the same time, I don’t want the reader to lose the sense of what else is going on in the story.

I need to focus on the anthology story today – I’m way behind on it and it’s due, well, on Friday. And I have shows tomorrow and Friday, so I better get to it. Plus, I have to write the pre-Belmont article on Friday. And a few letters and get a monologue drafted.

I’m waiting a few days to start FEMME FATALE and SIDEKICK; I want to see what the response to THE MATILDA MURDERS is first.

I hope to get a draft of the next ebook done next week, too, along with the new brochures.

I’m getting everything sorted out with Cablevision. Someone from the executive office is going to send someone to install it all – at no charge, unlike what I was told initially – which will negate the need for UPS, who can’t be bothered to deliver here anyway.

Oh, yeah, and even though I’m not leaving for the Cape until Sunday – I’m packed.

Devon

Devon’s Bookstore:


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

Published in: on May 28, 2008 at 8:34 am  Comments (4)  

Tuesday, May 27, 2008

Tuesday, May 27, 2008
Waning Moon
Pluto Retrograde
Jupiter Retrograde
Rainy and mild

So, did you have a good weekend? Are you ready for SUMMER?

I have links and things for you, so click to your heart’s content.

It’s time to catch up with my articles:

“The Misbehaving Character” in the current issue of VISION. I quote authors Colin Galbraith, Jenny Gardiner, and Jackie Kessler on how they handle characters that just won’t do what’s planned.

“Preakness Phenom”, up on FEMMEFAN, is my post-Preakness wrap-up, here.

In the same issue of FEMMEFAN, I have an article with suggestions on how to make racing safer.

In case you missed it, my Kentucky Derby wrap-up, “Run for the Roses: Triumph and Pain Intermixed” is here.

Got that?

Good.

On top of that, have you ever visited NASA’s website? It’s really cool. I hopped on because I’m interested in the Mars Phoenix Project. I didn’t realize how many concurrent projects are running at NASA right now. For some reason, I thought they’d lost all their funding and only the space shuttle stuff was going on. I was wrong, to say the least. Check it out if you get a chance.

And, continuing with Memorial Day honors, have you ever heard of The Arlington Ladies? They attend EVERY funeral at Arlington National Cemetery. They are a dedicated and amazing group of women.

Yesterday was pretty productive. Did a couple of drafts/polishes on THE MATILDA MURDERS, and went from feeling insecure about it to feeling pretty good. I’m taking another look at it this morning and off it goes. Read the material for Confidential Job #2 and took notes; will type and send them this morning. Didn’t get enough work done on the anthology story, but will drag it around with me today. Got out a few submissions.

Good morning’s work on the adaptation. I’m in the middle of a very complicated sequence right now.

I’m away from writing most of the day, because I was called in to work a photo call and then I have a show tonight.

So visit the links above and enjoy!

Devon

Adaptation: 45,176 words out of est. 90,000

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
45 / 90
(50.0%)

Devon’s Bookstore:


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

Published in: on May 27, 2008 at 7:26 am  Comments (4)  
Tags: , ,

Wednesday, May 14, 2008

Wednesday, May 14, 2008
Waxing Moon
Pluto Retrograde
Jupiter Retrograde
Sunny and pleasant

I got the material off to Confidential Job #1. I spent most of the day working on the revision of the essay. I’ll take another look at it and send it off today. It needs cutting, but I’ve cut as much as I can see to cut, and I trust my editor’s eye for the rest.

It was too nice a day to stay inside, but I was waiting for a delivery. Unfortunately, Staples called and has to deliver the bookcase today instead of yesterday, which is fine, no problem. But it better arrive today!

It was a quiet day, with a minimum of building crap. There’s always building crap, but I’m glad when it doesn’t interfere too much with everything else. The building’s new super has already proven himself to be management’s scumbag and not on our side at all and he’s only been here a few days. Oh, goody.

Got a decent morning’s work done on the adaptation, and now I will turn my attention to the first act of THE MATILDA MURDERS.

This is just a week of putting my head down and working, with as few distractions as I can manage.

I’m reading Gail Z. Martin’s THE BLOOD KING and enjoying it.

Sometimes, simple is good.

(I don’t mean the book I’m reading — I mean life)

Devon

Adaptation: 34,032 words out of est. 90,000

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
34 / 90
(37.8%)

Devon’s Bookstore:


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

Published in: on May 14, 2008 at 7:27 am  Comments (6)  

Monday, May 12, 2008

Monday, May 12, 2008
Waxing Moon
Pluto Retrograde
Jupiter Retrograde
Stormy

There are several topics to discuss to day, so I used sub-headers. Enjoy!

Negotiating Fees
So, I got a nasty but interesting email yesterday. Now, I get a couple of dozen nasty emails per week – that’s part of putting yourself out there. If you can’t deal with nasty emails, don’t have a blog/website/public life. Because there’s always the delete button and/or reporting the mailer to the ISP or the authorities, if it’s really squirrelly or dangerous. I don’t consider people who disagree with me necessarily nasty. Some dear friends and readers disagree with me on some issues, and/or give me a good solid kick when I need it, and that’s good. But there are also the parasites, and they’re a part of being out there. A lot of it comes from wanna-be writers I’ve never met and have no reason to deal with who demand that I coach/critique/write their idea for nothing/”get them published”, because as a published writer, I “owe” it to unpublished writers to get them published.

Now, we writers work our butts off, and most of us pay it forward, help other writers . . .who are willing to put in the work. But, simply because I am published and someone else is not, I do not “owe” that person anything. Help needs to be earned.

However, this nasty email was a little different and interesting enough for me to mention the topic. The person wrote that I am a hypocrite, because I advocate sticking to one’s rates, adding things like “aggravation fees” and late payments, and setting boundaries. This person claims to have read something of mine on a site I will call “Site X” for the purposes of this discussion, and then read the guidelines, which state that writers are unpaid. Therefore, I must be a hypocrite.

Uh, no. There’s a difference between taking on a pro bono client and writing 100 articles to sell at $1/each or not getting paid for them at all.

I have a couple of pro bono clients. Usually, it’s for a cause or organization in which I have a deep personal investment and belief. And, in spite of being pro bono, we still have a contract in place so that there are no misunderstandings. I also use samples of the work I do for these clients in my portfolio, landing me other, paid work.

I also write/have written for publications/sites that state in their guidelines that they do not pay writers. However, everything is negotiable. That doesn’t mean I sent them a submission and said, “You gotta pay me for this or else.” Most of these publications have approached me to write for them and we’ve negotiated a fee. That’s different then sending in something over the transom. And if you don’t know what sending over the transom means . . .go look it up.

I’ve always said, in discussions about payment, that each individual needs to negotiate on a case-by-case basis. When you say, “I never pick up a pen for less than X” – fine. But you may well miss some great opportunities. You may be in a position to do so, and that is YOUR CHOICE. Sometimes you come across a publication you think is just great and also has growth potential, and you want to be involved. Go for it. I choose not to join bidding sites, because I firmly do not believe in paying for job listings; if an employer simply wants to go for the lowest bid instead of the best writer, that is the employer’s prerogative, and it shows me that we’re not a good match anyway, so why put either of us through a miserable experience? I also choose not to work for sites that want a large amount of content per week/month churned out for a pittance. First of all, I don’t believe that many writers can maintain quality at that high a volume – and, if they can, they ought to be working for people who pay $1/word, because they’ll be able to retire in Tahiti in about five years – and they deserve so to do. Second, I don’t want to be tied down to a single site for 20 articles a week for crap money for weeks or months on end because I get too many good, well-paying, fascinating opportunities coming in and many of them involve travel. Third, I actually value my work and, by focusing on clients who value strong skills and content, we’re both happy and well-paid.

It’s case by case and everyone needs to make their own decisions and draw their own boundaries. The problem, in many cases, is once you establish yourself at working for crap pay, the companies willing to pay more are unlikely to hire you because they believe you get what you pay for; in other words, if your previous employers paid crap, that must be what they got. By establishing a reasonable fee within your market (and a small-town market’s reasonable fee will be different than a fee in a corporation based in New York or Los Angeles), you gain respect and are paid within the ballpark of what you’re worth. Because let’s face it, do we ever truly believe we’re being paid what we’re worth? We always want to challenge ourselves to move to the next level.

Do your research on the potential employer, have a clear-headed view of your own qualifications and how fast you write, and go from there. And talk to other freelancers – those who do it full-time – to get an idea of fee structures.

Life Stuff
Had a great day with my mom. Talked to my grandmother and she sounded good (what a relief). Went to White Plains, to one of my favorite Asian markets to get some vegetables, replace the bagua mirror for the front door that the scumbags smashed a few weeks ago (wouldn’t want to be them when that karma makes its return trip), and picked up a ceramic jar that I’m going to use as a kind of a “prayer pot” and a little ceramic bowl to use for . . .well, I’m not sure, but it was pretty, and I bought it.

Helped a friend move a massive piece of furniture. We celebrated with a beer (Blue Moon, of course). And another neighbor gave me a stack of leather-bound books she was getting rid of. I look forward to going through them!

I’m booked on a bunch of shows over the coming weeks, and the schedule works out so that the days I’m not on the show, I can be up in MA house hunting and doing some other work that’s booked up there. Even if the relocation starts during those weeks, I have a place I can stay here and complete my commitment. So it’s all good.

Mostly took the day off as a “holy day” celebrating my mom and some great women in my life.

Unfortunately, my mom got sick in the night, so I’m playing nurse today to make sure she’s okay.

Writing
Most of it was mental work, not physical. Lots of “mental writing” – plotting, working things out, making a few notes on a few different projects, some pacing and muttering. Got some work done on the adaptation. It keeps surprising me in a good way. It will be able to be a complete stand-alone; there’s also room to do more with these characters that doesn’t hinge on this book. So it’s the best of both worlds.

So today, I have to give the work for Confidential Job #1 its polish and I have to dive into the essay. I have some serious deadlines this week, so I better hop to it. Because I have a short week, due to the Preakness, and next week’s looking pretty busy, with a research trip to the Museum of Natural History, the PEN Literary Awards, acupuncture, and shows.

I had a good morning’s work on the adaptation. Now, on to everything else.

Kent, thanks for stopping by. I’ll look for your YA story, and I’m also looking forward to what comes out in the future.

Hope you have a great start to your week!

Devon

Adaptation – 30,626 words out of est. 90,000

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
30 / 90
(33.3%)

Devon’s Bookstore:


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

Published in: on May 12, 2008 at 7:58 am  Comments (10)  

Sunday, May 11, 2008

Sunday, May 11, 2008
Waxing Moon
Pluto Retrograde
Jupiter Retrograde
Sunny and pleasant
Mother’s Day

Happy Mother’s Day!

To all of you out there who are my friends and readers and who are mothers, a blessing to you for a day where you are shown how much you’re loved and appreciated, and may you have many more years of daily love and appreciation to come.

I was going to discuss several points about blogging that recently came up, but decided to save it for an article for this week’s SDR blog. So there! 😉

Busy day yesterday: Banking, bill paying, post office (the rates go up Monday, don’t forget), dealing with Verizon wireless (they are such a pain in far too many parts of my anatomy), bookstore, wine store, grocery store.

When I got my mom her bookstore gift card, I also decided to pick up a couple of books for myself. This store had nothing by any of the authors from MISSPELLED, which annoyed me. However, I picked up BLOOD KING, Gail Z. Martin’s next book (and I’m hoping there are fewer typos than in THE SUMMONER). I’m interested to see where the story goes from where THE SUMMONER stopped. I also picked up a book called DHAMPIR by Barb & J.C. Hendee, which looks and sounds very interesting. I think it’s the first of a series. It’s supposed to be quite witty, according to an actual person who recommended it to me. It’s a person whose opinion I trust, and someone who didn’t just think it was good because she liked it, but she thought the writing, the characters, and the wit would be aspects to which I’d respond.

I know we live in the Cult of the Book Blurb, but I hate them. Blurbs on the cover are more likely to make me put the book down and not buy it than to take it to the register. I don’t want to be told what to think about it, unless I personally know the author and have a reason to respect that author’s opinion. And then, the book will be recommended to me other than on a blurb. A lot of the cover art nowadays also turns me off – it’s too similar.

MISSPELLED has one of the best covers I’ve seen in a long time. But, actually, it was the title that made me pick up the book. I wanted an anthology, and the title was clever. Then I looked at the cover, which I thought was lovely. Then I looked at the editor, whose name was new-to-me, and thought, “Great.” Then I read the back of the book, and it sounded good. I just looked at the cover and, guess what – no blurbs! No wonder I bought it. Then I read a few random paragraphs. And it had to come home with me.

And it just happens to be one of the best books I’ve read in a long time.

Anyway, I went to the bakery to get my mom a cheesecake for Mother’s Day. Cheesecake is her favorite thing, and I’ve never mastered the art of making a really good one. I can make all sorts of other cakes, but haven’t gotten the knack down for cheesecake.

In the afternoon, I wrote my pre-Preakness article, started the write-up for Confidential Job #1, roughed out in my head the script (tentatively titled THE MATILDA MURDERS), caught up on blogs and BookMooch, and roughed out two more stories. I also started playing with a better tracking system for the short stories. The Submission Log’s useful to let me know what’s out, what’s in, what’s paid, but I need a history of each story in one place, not different documents for different years, and a central location as to the length, pseudonym, and genre (or lack of genre) for each. It’ll take weeks to sort out properly, but it will be worth it in the long run.

I’m reading SUMMERS AT CASTLE AUBURN, which I enjoy. I see glimmers of some of my favorite characters in the Twelve Houses series here – they could be relatives; they are, at least, what Anne of Green Gables would call “kindred spirits”. Elisandra in this book reminds me of Casserah; Roderick could be a more easy-going cousin to Justin. It’s very interesting.

I’m getting a new, 5 shelf oak bookcase on Tuesday. Can’t wait. Then I can bring more books back out of storage.

On, in response to all your helpful comments about how to stop the mail tampering – building management knows it’s happening and doesn’t care. The perpetrator claims he’s doing it at their instruction. It is simply another tactic o their part to drive people out of the building. Management has been talked to about this for months. Now, it’s time to bring in the feds. When one or more of their people are arrested, maybe they’ll realize we mean business.

Now, some quality time with my mother, and some writing time.

Devon

Published in: on May 11, 2008 at 6:39 am  Comments (4)  
Tags: ,

Saturday, May 10, 2008

Saturday, May 10, 2008
Waxing Moon
Pluto Retrograde
Jupiter Retrograde
Cloudy and warm

I’m back. I lived a lifetime in a few days, and had my hands full with my elderly relatives and their primary care person, who was also under the weather. Unfortunately, I can’t go into details without invading their privacy, much as I would like your opinions on some of the events. Let’s just say it was – and is – complicated.

We had some beautiful days, though. I managed to stop for awhile at one of the Ongonquit beaches. On another day, I drove up to Naples and around Long Lake and Sebago Lake. Just gorgeous.

I stopped at three great restaurants: Amore Breakfast in Ongonquit, The Stone Dog Café in North Windham, and my old favorite, The Egg and I, in Ogonquit. Of course, we stopped at The Stonewall Kitchen to stock up. They have a new Roasted Apple grilling sauce that’s wonderful, and a Mango Lime Salsa. Plus, I needed the Garlic Teriyaki and the Wasabi Ginger sauces.

I continued reading Will in the World, and taking notes for the various projects it feeds. It truly is one of the best biographies I’ve ever read. The author, Shakespearean scholar Stephan Greenblatt, has a play he co-wrote, Cardenio, opening at the American Repertory Theatre in Cambridge. I’d like to get up there to see it. It’s only running until June 8, and I’m not sure I can get up there within the time frame, but I’d like to.

I was disappointed in two other books I took up with me. Both were by authors I don’t know personally, but whose work I’ve read before, and who I understand from others are lovely people. Both sell very well, and I respect what they’ve achieved in the business. One author’s work I’d read before and liked; the other’s work I’d read before and it exasperated me, due to the lack of research and believability. The attitude that came across to me was, “well, I’m writing fiction, so who cares? I’m supposed to make it up.” I thought maybe I’d been unfair and should give Author #2 another chance with my money and time. Won’t make that mistake again. The ideas were fun, but poorly executed. The work took place overseas, and it was obviously she got her info from the tourist board and something like Wikipedia. There was no sense of anything unique about it – it was advertorial travel babble, not a true sense of place. And, while I thought some of the ideas were clever, the execution was poor. I know this author sells A LOT, but, although some of the ideas are clever and fun, I find the writing sloppy and all the protagonists and antagonists always sound exactly the same, no matter from which country they supposedly originate. There’s no cadence, there’s no individuality in either people or place. And it drives me nuts.

At least there weren’t any typos. That author has a good copyeditor!

The other book, by the author whose work I previously liked, was an even bigger disappointment. Again, some interesting ideas. But I loathed the female protagonist. There was absolutely no reason for me to give a damn whether or not she survived, much less succeeded in her quest. I hated her and wished she’d be killed off. She was weak, stupid, and selfish, and, when she had shown zero growth by the midpoint of the book and zero potential for it, I put the book down.

But no typos. 😉

I did read the last chapter to see if I should go back and read the second half of the book – couldn’t be bothered. Ick. Which is a shame, because I’ve really enjoyed other work by this author. It doesn’t put me off the author, unless the next few books alienate me as well. I think writers should write whatever they want to explore, and not every book is going to please every reader. It is the writer’s right to follow the vision. Once I’ve decided I like a writer, it usually takes several books to alienate me.

I got more writing done than I expected, which is good. Of course, none of it was on what I planned to work. It was an idea I had while in Maine, and Maine is practically a character in it. It means doing some research on the natural history of Maine, but that will be fun.

I also got some ideas for a new Fearless Ink brochure, which I will sketch out and work on this week. I found some places for whom I’d really like to write on this trip, but I need a new brochure, and I think I’m out of business cards.

The mail tampering in this building has gotten out of control. It’s time to bring in the US Postal Inspectors. I had someone stop by to pick up the mail every day I was gone after work – and by the time the person got here, the mail that didn’t fit into the boxes had been tossed. I’ve talked to management over and over and OVER about this, and we have an eyewitness to the perpetrator, who was spoken to about the fact that removing someone’s mail is a felony. His response was to shrug, walk away, and keep doing it. Time to bring in the feds. I put up a poster provided by the post office with the consequences of mail tampering and it was ripped off the wall during the day. Gee, wonder who’s doing it? Three guesses, bet you’ll get it in one. I’m going to keep printing them and keep putting them up. It is my right, as it is my right to have un-tampered mail. I should not have to pay for a post office box because building employees are thieves. I warned building management what the consequences would be of ignoring this situation; now it’s time to show them I’m serious.

Yesterday was a raw, rainy, cold day, so of course I was running around like crazy and got soaked to the skin. I’d had to cancel out of a few things because of complications in Maine and here at the building. But I was still running around enough to be soaked to the skin.

On the up side, I stopped in a bookstore because I wanted something different. I wanted new-to-me authors and something I wasn’t being paid to read.

I picked up two books. One, Summers at Castle Auburn, is by one of my favorite authors, Sharon Shinn. The other is an anthology called Misspelled, edited by a new-to-me author (with an amazing track record) named Julie E. Czerneda. I started reading it on the train, and all I have to say is:

WOW!

What a great, witty, charming, intelligent, inventive collection of stories! I can’t wait to go to the bookstore and get more by these authors. I sat down and read the whole anthology late last night and into this morning, cover to cover. I liked every single story in it, but my favorites were “Trippingly off the Tongue” by Lesley Livingston, “8 rms, full bsmt” by Kristine Smith, “Chafing the Bogyman” by Kristen Britain,, “A Perfect Circle” by Kent Pollard, and “Crosscut” by S.W. Mayse (every writer should read this one). It was actually hard to pick these, because I liked all the stories so much. The first two mentioned particularly enchanted me. Livingston either just had a novel come out, or one is coming out this summer, and I’ll definitely buy it. I don’t want to tell authors what to write (hating it so much myself), but I hope Kristine Smith does more with her story’s characters. I can’t stand golf and Kristen Britain’s story still captured me. I don’t game or know anything about gaming, but Pollard’s story was so well written it hooked and carried me. All of the stories are worth reading – the inventiveness, the quality of writing, the flashes of humor!

Bookstore, here I come!

What a great way to end the week!

Tons of errands to run this morning, and bills to pay. And then I have to buckle down and have a very productive writing weekend. Deadlines are looming, some new contracts came in, and next month’s bills will be here before I want them.

A new idea sprang fully formed into my head. I’ll make some notes on it, and put it in the queue.

Devon

Monday, May 5, 2008

Monday, May 5, 2008
New Moon
Pluto Retrograde
Sunny and pleasant

It feels as though my soul is sick. That’s the only way I can describe it, because this is far more than just physical exhaustion. It feels as though the whole weight of the last three years, which started with my mom’s accident and the Evil Developers trying to drive everyone into the street just hit me with a wallop.

However, people tend to be kind if you allow it, and I’m certainly allowing people to be kind right now. All of you are lovely, and several clients and potential clients understand that I will be out of touch most of this week, dealing with family matters.

The coward in me doesn’t want to go to Maine to face the inevitable, but I know I would always regret it if I didn’t go.

I slept most of the day yesterday, but was, basically, non-functional. I packed, and my writing bag is almost packed. I hope that the pleasure I always take in the journey will give me strength so I can take care of my grandmother and everyone else who needs to be taken care of once I get up there.

Wrote and got out my post-Derby article, with a few choice words for those who want to ban the sport. Because, as usual, those who screech the loudest have no suggestions for the care of the tens of thousands of horses who would be left homeless by such a ban. If you’re going to pretend to be an activist, take an active part in coming up with solutions, not just standing on a soap box making proclamations.

Celayne, I understand your disagreement. But, like the rest, you did not offer a solution. Have you ever spent any time around thoroughbred barns? Have you ever seen the interaction between the horse and the trainer, the horse and its jockey, and, especially, the horse and the groom? At least 10,000 thoroughbreds are foaled per year. Horses live between 20-30 years, and it takes a couple of thousand dollars per week to feed and house them. If an immediate ban were put on the sport, the majority would be sent to slaughterhouses and turned into dog food, because there’s no one to feed them and care for them. You have dogs, Celeyne. Chances are good that if you feed them purchased food instead of preparing your own that you’re feeding them race horses that have been sent to the slaughterhouse once they stopped earning their keep. Most dog food has horsemeat in it. It doesn’t say so on the can, but do a little research on your particular brand. Even some of the so-called “natural” foods use horse meat as their main source. Where do you think that comes from? Not from horses that died natural deaths. What solution do you propose? What, personally, do you intend to do to manifest change? How many of those horses are you personally willing to take on? How many ex-racehorses have you adopted? Now, I don’t have one sitting in the parking lot, but horse charities are where the majority of my donations go. In other words, although I don’t keep one in the courtyard, I do pay money every month towards keeping rescued and retired racehorses fed and alive. If I had a farm and the income, I’d have a facility for rescued/injured/retired thoroughbreds. That’s one of my dreams. Along with a financial plan to make sure they aren’t sold to slaughter once I die. But to simply ban the sport without having a plan IN PLACE to care for these thousands of animals is a larger act of cruelty than to try to fix the sport from the inside.

I’m about to take the car in for its 10K check-up. Barely a year old, and already 10K! Gas is now between $4.29 and $4.69 a gallon up here. Bush just keeps letting his friends economically rape us, and he just sits back and giggles. If I can come up with at least a dozen viable solutions to ease the pain at the pump, the government should be able to come up and implement twice as many. But Bush will never see his buddies make less than a double billion figure profit, no matter how much of this country descends into poverty and recession. Because it doesn’t affect him personally, he has the ability to ignore any reality he doesn’t like, and he simply does not care, as long as he gets to play President and do as he darn well pleases, getting stroked by big business.

I’m off line most of this week, up in Maine, taking care of my grandmother. I will check in when I get back.

Devon

Devon’s Bookstore:


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

Published in: on May 5, 2008 at 6:27 am  Comments (8)  

Sunday, May 4, 2008

Sunday, May 4, 2008
Dark Moon
Pluto Retrograde
Cloudy and cool

Nothing like waking up on Derby Day with a migraine. And I mean the Anytime-you-want-to-stop-jabbing-that-icepick-in-my-eye-
would-be-great migraine.

Skipping out was not an option.

To backtrack a bit: The show was fine Friday night. I said my farewells to the actor who’s leaving the show (while I’m covering the Preakness). I was surprised he remembered that it was our last show together, but he did. Hopefully, our paths will cross again – he’s one of the good ones, both on and off stage. I’ll probably send something over to his opening night this summer.

Finished The Summoner. It follows high fantasy quest tradition, and it does so well. There’s some wonderfully imaginative and inventive stuff in there. I look forward to reading the next book in the series. There were a few lapses of logic I found difficult to roll with, but perhaps they were set deliberately in order to set up something in a future book. And the copy editor should be fired. It is inexcusable that a book on the store shelves should mix up “where” and “were” AND have such a high rate of typos. I was furious, especially on behalf of the author, who I am sure pointed all of these out in the galleys. Obviously, the manuscript was only run through spell check and a copy editor didn’t actually sit there and read it. The amount of mistakes in books lately is truly, truly appalling. When I pay full price for a book, I expect all the steps in the production process to be taken, and I expect the book to be free of typos.

Yesterday morning, I had to go grocery shopping before the race card began because I needed cat food and had to make the stuff for the party.

I had trouble getting going, though. I was overtired, which meant I couldn’t retain body heat, so I was freezing and shivering. Rethought my clothing and opted for something warmer, but still spent most of the day wrapped in a horse’s blanket (don’t ask, really, my on-site colleagues are going to be teasing me about it until I’m ninety).

I got some potentially positive responses to some ads I recently answered, so that’s sorted. Llewellyn’s hired me for a 2010 calendar piece. That’s sorted. I may be working for a travel site. I’m up for a script job. All good.

I was late getting to the races because I received bad news from a friend that another close friend’s father died last night. So I wanted to see what I could do.

The races were quite interesting, for the most part, and, prediction-wise, I did pretty well.

Although I had Big Brown in my picks as a safety, I honestly didn’t think he’d keep his head together enough to win. The fact that he did indicates he could very well be one of the “freak” horses.

The tragedy of the day was the death of Eight Belles. As the day progressed, I fell more and more in love with her: Her beauty, her poise, her intelligence. She was radiant. I went from thinking she’d finish ninth or tenth in the Derby to believing she could be in the top three.

She came in second – then fell, breaking both front ankles, and had to be euthanized on the track. Completely heartbreaking. But, it’s about time the general public see the dark side of horse racing, with both Barbaro’s accident two years ago and this one. Positive change will not come in this sport, and certainly not quickly enough, unless tens of thousands of people realize what’s going on.

Banning horse racing is not, in my opinion, the answer. Banning the sport would result in tens of thousands of horses going to the slaughterhouse, which is certainly worse than what’s happening now. The price of dog food would go down, but it would be an equine holocaust.

But changes need to be made over a period of months, not decades, which is how long it’s been taking. The well-being of both horses and jockeys needs to be taken more seriously by the industry as a whole. Individual trainers and owners are doing what they can do, but until the rules change – and they haven’t, for the most part, since the 1800’s – the mortality rate will continue to rise.

Unfortunately, it’s corporations making the profits in the sport, not the individual owners, trainers, and jockeys who actually take the risk. And, as in the rest of our society, the corporate executives don’t care as long as they can make obscene amounts of money to pay off their wives and sustain their mistresses.

Until the corporate culture is destroyed, our society, as a whole, is going down the road of Rome. And we all see how well that turned out.

Only our ruins won’t last for centuries.

I was not in the mood for a party after the races. I came home and was in bed by 8:30. I stayed in bed for nearly twelve hours. Not always asleep – I was plagued by bad dreams. But exhausted. And I don’t feel much better today.

I’m sad: sad for Eight Belles; sad for the deaths of my friends’ parents over the last few weeks; sad because my grandmother is getting worse.

I have an article and a review to write. And then I have to finish packing for Maine. The next few weeks are going to be busy, some good, some difficult.

On a positive side, as I was driving to and from the grocery store yesterday, I got an aha! moment as far as Yuri’s Tale: Gunslinger Cole Larkin’s backstory was revealed to me, and I’m starting to figure out the structure. This book is certainly a challenge. Not in a bad way, but a challenge.

All I want to go is to go back to bed, but I’ve got work to do before I leave for Maine.

Devon

Thursday, May 1, 2008

Thursday, May 1, 2008
Waning Moon
Saturn Retrograde
Pluto Retrograde
Sunny and cool
Beltane

The latest idiocy by scumbag landlords nearly got someone hurt or worse. By me.

At a little after eight yesterday morning, someone was on my fire escape with a hammer. Now, as I’ve mentioned before, I lived on the Deuce in Manhattan for 13 years, pre-Disney. Over a strip club. When someone turns up on the fire escape wielding a hammer, to me, that signals an attack.

The poor guy’s lucky I didn’t toss him right off. He could have been killed. I did scare the bejesus out of him (is that blasphemy? If so, apologies). If they were sending workers up the fire escapes to do brick work, we should have been notified. And we weren’t.

Then, when I tried to leave to go to work, the lobby was partitioned off with plastic and they were doing something unnecessary with a jackhammer. When I tried to get out the only door to the outside world, I was told I had to wait until “two or three” in the afternoon. I said no, I had to go to work. The workmen shrugged and said, “You can’t go through until two or three.”

So I yanked out the power cord for the jackhammer, ripped down the plastic, said, “Rethink that,” and walked out of the building.

Idiots.

In typical fashion, there was no one to deal with the problems at the credit union. They were all “in a meeting”. Typical.

Shows were fine, though. A few people are out, so there were some swings on, but everyone knows what they’re doing. They rarely have Wednesday matinees, so they were pretty delirious. I told one of my actors, “I know it’s painful now, but just think how good you’ll feel on Sunday when you only have one instead of two shows.”

Had a great dinner as Osteria Pepe Rosso with a close friend, and we played catch up. Turned out both she and her sister dressed the author of a novel I’m reading for review, when this author was in her acting days.

Altogether now: “It’s a small world after all. . ..”

Okay, I really shouldn’t have done that, because now that darned song will be in my head all day!

Finished reading material for my next assignment for Confidential Job #1. Now I’ll have to write it up. Sent a requested pitch to one of my editors for the 2010 annuals. I have to negotiate a possible fee for a potential client overseas.. I’d like to do the work, but right now the price is too low, and I literally cannot afford to work for that, especially not with the amount of research involved.

Yuri’s Tale is percolating, but haven’t gotten more words on paper yet. Got some more work done on the adaptation. Started working on an idea for a longish short story for an anthology that’s due at the end of the month.

Started reading The Summoner by Gail Z. Martin; the first chapters are quite fascinating.

I have some errands today, and I’d like to get a good bit of writing done. Another show tonight, and, yippee, it’s pay day.

I’m a little worried because my pre-Derby article isn’t up yet; if it doesn’t go up today or tomorrow, there’s no point in it, because the Derby will be done. Urgh.

Melissa Mc – sounds like you had a great trip in NYC. You were probably at South Street Seaport – a great place to visit. New York’s got a lot of terrific things in it. When you stayed at the Marriott, did you ride the glass elevators? People either love them or totally freak out.

The image file won’t upload on WordPress today. Oh, well.

Devon

Adaptation: 25,796 words out of est. 90,000

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
25 / 90
(27.8%)

Devon’s Bookstore:


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

Published in: on May 1, 2008 at 7:53 am  Comments (9)  

Wednesday, April 30, 2008

Wednesday, April 30, 2008
Waning Moon
Saturn Retrograde
Pluto Retrograde
Sunny and cool

Cold, rainy day yesterday.

Worked on the adaptation. In this section, I can stay close to the original screenplay; however, I have to add quite a bit later on for it all to make sense and really hold together as a novel. There are quick explanations that one can get away with in a screenplay that simply won’t hold up in the novel. For it to have the emotional impact I want, I have to deepen it, layer it, work out some of the kinks. I’m also deepening the relationship between Zenda and Sam earlier. While, if this was visual and I had three-dimensional actors working the material, a great deal could be left unsaid. Their bodies would do the “speaking” instead of the words. In the novelization, a great deal remains unspoken between them, but it still needs to be on the page. Even if it’s done through action and gesture and behavior rather than narration, it still needs to be there.

Worked on Yuri’s Tale. Actually, I stopped working to make some continuity notes and do some world-building. The problem with that is that I wind up staring at the page. Unlike Earth Bride, where I could do dozens of pages of world-building as I created the outline and THEN write, the participants in Yuri’s Tale want to reveal it to me as it goes along. So I’m doing more note-taking than world-building and letting the characters reveal the world to be in this draft. A little frustrating, but. . .that’s the way it is. Also, I realized I need to start the book with Esmé, not Yuri (yet another reason the title needs to change). At first I thought it could be a prologue, but the more I mull it over, the more I realize no, it needs to be a chapter focused on Esmé before they arrive in Solmer and Yuri’s taven. I’ll set part of it on the ship The Sea Trotter, and part of it . . .well, you’ll just have to read it to find out!

This is the kind of situation where a writer who insists on total control over everything from the get-go would just stop. But, if you trust your characters (i.e., your subconscious) to get you through even the disjointed bits, you’ll push through and have something better at the end than if you tried to control it all so tightly before you set a word on paper. Rewrites are good places to impose structure and logic. First drafts are to trust your characters and your imagination.

Did an extra yoga session yesterday afternoon and it made a big difference.

Commute sucked both ways, and too many SFT’s in the city. Brandy and Melissa, you wouldn’t behave like an SFT, because you naturally think about others. It’s your nature. I don’t mind the tourists who come here and are amazed by all the wonderful things in New York; I mind the ones who are rude, thoughtless (it’s not New Yorkers who are rude, it’s the tourists), and treat those of us who live here as though we’re their personal maids.

Show was fine. I had to tell one of my Dear Hearts this was our last week working together on this show; he’s off to do another show (he’ll be wonderful in it) and I’m covering the Preakness during his last weekend on this show. So we are going to savor every performance together this week! Seriously, working with these actors is always good for me – they’re loving and joyful as well as being talented, and working with them opens my heart a little every time. Which is good, considering how closed and ready for battle I always have to be in my own home.

I have to go and pitch a fit at the credit union this morning. It seems anyone can walk up to any ATM and wipe out my checking and savings, as they did in January, but I can’t get to my own money, and I’m sick of it.

Taped a show last night on which I thought an acquaintance was guest-starring (because he told me so). He’d teased me that he’d call at midnight to see how I liked it (I got home at 11). So I watch the whole darned thing – and he’s not on it! He called, I mentioned it, and he said, “Yeah, that kind of sucks, doesn’t it?” I’m not sure if the episodes got shuffled around or he’s in an upcoming one or what. And it’s not a show I’d watch if he hadn’t told me he had a guest spot! He so owes me! 😉

Very short writing day today; I have two shows and I have to take a train shortly after 10:30. I want to get more writing done before that, so this is a short post.

Devon

Adaptation: 23,460 words out of est. 90,000

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
23 / 90
(25.6%)

Devon’s Bookstore:


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

Tuesday, April 29, 2008

Tuesday, April 29, 2008
Waning Moon
Saturn Retrograde
Pluto Retrograde
Rainy and cool

So the scumbags in the building shut off our water yesterday. No notice, nothing. Just, at 10 AM – no water. Not acceptable. I called to complain, and was told, “well, I don’t know what it is, but maybe it’s an emergency repair.” Guess what, dumb ass? You still have to post signs IMMEDIATELY. And it wasn’t an emergency repair. The unsupervised construction guys who don’t know what they’re doing messed up something. I found out that’s exactly what happened – they weren’t paying attention when they worked on a wall and cut through a water pipe. How much do you bet if I hadn’t pitched a fit, we would have been without water all day?

Not to mention the fact that it’s raining and in the 40s, but they don’t give us heat – although by law, they are required so to do until the 15th of MAY.

Urgh.

Didn’t get much writing done, because I was dealing with all this building crap. Again.

Got a few submissions out. I have to find a second way of tracking manuscripts. The Submission Log is great for keeping track of what’s out there, but I need to go back to a card file with each title on a card and the submission history of that title. Because trying to track through multiple years (which happens, when pieces are held for 4-6 months) is driving me nuts.

Pitched for a few jobs. The job boards really are posting to the lowest common amateur lately. Very frustrating.

Finished Dark Moon Defender. Still don’t feel that Ellynor is good enough for Justin. But I have to trust in the author’s overall vision of the series. And now I have to wait until September for Cammon’s book! Oh, well, at least I’m deeply engaged in the story and characters, right?

Spent time with my friend; we spent most of the day together, actually, in spite of everything else going on, and had a nice dinner out.

Got some work done on both the adaptation and Yuri’s Tale. Got the notes for the revision of the essay from my editor, so I’ll tackle that soon, too, and talked to an actress friend about a monologue I’m writing for her.

Short writing day today because I’ve got a show tonight, and I have to leave early enough to get there on time. I do not commute well. I have some errands to run today, too, that need to be done out here, not in the city.

My friend leaves tonight, so we’ll spend some time together today, in and around everything else that’s going on.

Not a whole lot to say – this week is about writing and the shows.

Devon

Adaptation: 22,310 words out of est. 90,000

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
22 / 90
(24.4%)

Yuri’s Tale: 6,878 words out of est. 100,000

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
6 / 100
(6.0%)

Devon’s Bookstore:


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

Published in: on April 29, 2008 at 8:54 am  Comments (3)