Saturday, May 31, 2008

Saturday, May 31, 2008
Waning Moon
Pluto Retrograde
Jupiter Retrograde
Cloudy and warm

I got the pre-Belmont article done, but had to rewrite part of it this morning as things continue to develop. But that’s out, and will be up at some point next week.

And we don’t even want to talk about the journalist who drank so much he passed out on my living room floor. Trust me, it’s a long story. And Violet, the littlest cat, just says, “Talk to the tail.” She is furious with me.

The Cable Guy came and I have my channels back, along with a whole bunch more I’ll never watch.

Looks like I’ll be doing some copywriting for a lingerie company. They’re sending me some samples. I guess I’m supposed to test them?

And I walked away from writing a sports comic because I feel the creator is misogynistic. Why? I looked at the established characters and all the women were insulting clichés. When I asked (in an unusually diplomatic fashion) if I could introduce some new female characters, he asked what was wrong with the ones he had, and I said I felt there were no positive female characters in the current repertoire. His response, “All women who attend sports events are sluts and losers looking to fuck the athletes, and then, sometimes, the rest of us get what’s left over.”

I was very quiet for a beat. I didn’t explode. I simply said, “We’re not going to be a good fit. Good-bye.” And hung up.

Show was a lot of fun last night. I truly enjoy the people with whom I work.

I’m reading Gay Talese’s autobiography. It amazes me how many writers whose work I respect started out writing about sports.

My bags are packed; I’m going to repack my writer’s bag. Camera’s ready, extra batteries, folder of information for everything I need this coming week.

I have a show tonight, get home at midnight, up at 4:30 and off to the Cape for a few days, a combination of research for some articles, background for THE BALTHAZAAR TREASURE, and house hunting. That means I’ll be offline until sometime towards the middle or end of next week.

“Racing Ink” will go up on Friday, June 6, handicapping the entire Belmont card.

Have a great few days, and I’ll check in when I get back!

Devon

Devon’s Bookstore:


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

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Published in: on May 31, 2008 at 9:08 am  Comments (7)  
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Friday, May 30, 2008

Friday, May 30, 2008
Waning Moon
Pluto Retrograde
Jupiter Retrograde
Sunny and warm

It’s official: I signed a contract with Firedrakes Weyr Publishing this morning for HEX BREAKER. Stay tuned for release dates, cover art, and more.

I heard back from the producer who was interested in THE MATILDA MURDERS. She likes it a lot, but asked for some revisions, mostly due to the site requirements. Not a problem – I’ll get on it. And now I can dive into FEMME FATALE and SIDEKICK, knowing those site requirements.

Whew! Happy!

I received an interesting question the other day that I’m answering on the blog. The questioner asked if I do a lot of paid blogging jobs, and, if not, didn’t I think it would be a great fit?

This blog is MINE, not owned by some corporation. I consider it part of my business in writing, but also as a way to keep in contact with people all over the world, and shed a bit of light on one writer’s creative process and how I try to make that balance and fit in to the business of writing. While I’m not getting a salary for INK, I’ve landed some really cool gigs from people who found me through the blog, and, when you break down that money, it comes out to a decent amount connected to the blog. I also don’t want to put advertising on this blog (other than talking about other people’s stuff I like or having Devon’s Bookstore below) because I want this to be a restful place, not a place blaring with ads. In fact, I’ve dropped several blogs recently because I feel like all they want is my money, not mutual interaction. I know some people who have advertising on their personal blogs, but, honestly, for a buck twenty-five a month, I don’t think it’s worth it.

Most of the paid blogging jobs I’ve come across thus far have had three drawbacks, which make them poor fits for me:

–Low pay. I’m sorry, $5/post is insulting, even if it’s only about 200 words. Especially if I have to do research. It simply is not a wise use of my time. Even $10-$15/post is pretty slim. Some blog sites pay by the month with the chance of revenue share as well. However, if I toss out the revenue carrot and divide the number of posts by the fee, it often still works out to $5 or $10/post. Again, not worth the time and effort.

–Too many posts expected. A lot of sites want 1-2 posts per day. That’s reasonable for some topics, a little too much for others. Not every topic can sustain 30 posts per month. Some sites want even more. As a writer, I think it’s too much content expected, again, for often low pay. As a reader, if a blog has too many posts per day, I drop it because I don’t have that kind of time to spend on it, again, especially if it’s just trying to sell me something. It gives me a headache.

–I don’t want to be that tied down. Some blogs let you write ahead and schedule posting. Others don’t. I travel a lot, both for writing and pleasure. Although I’ll have a laptop soon, I don’t have one now, and, frankly, when I’m on the road immersed in a project, I’m not going to split my focus with something else. So that means I’m not as good a fit for a daily blogging gig as someone who works from home all the time without a lot of traveling.

I admire people who can sustain daily paid blog gigs well. I simply haven’t yet found the right gig for me, nor am I convinced it’s out there. Since the heritage recipe blog gig fell through, a couple of years ago, I’ve looked at several other blog gigs, but applied for very few. 1-2 posts a week I think is sane. 1-2 posts a day simply does not work in the way my life is currently set up, or in the overall vision for my writing career. I’d rather spend that time writing fiction. Blogging is not “easy money”. It takes dedication and skill. And when a company is paying you to present a product or a point of view, it’s different than when you’re speaking from the heart. So there are all sorts of aspects to factor in when considering a blogging job.

So, the photo call yesterday was . . .an adventure. Tuesday I stood on the curb in Chelsea with costumes and ironing board; yesterday, I did the same thing in front of the New York Stock Exchange. My life’s so glamorous. Yeah.

We had a good car to get up there – Ford Esplanade, which meant the ironing board fit in the back. But we were in one of the most security-conscious buildings downtown, full of government offices and no arrangements had been made for us – I just took my garment bags and plowed on through – the guard told me to open my bags and I said, “You open them. My hands are full.” It was that kind of day. We’re in a space under construction, with so much dust I was a Banshee With a Lint Brush all afternoon – and they tell us we can’t plug in. Now, we had a steamer, an iron, and hair and make-up had all their stuff that needed electricity. So they hand us a box of extension cords and we figure out how to run power out of sockets in the ceililng.

I’m telling ya, the glamour of Broadway.

The people for whom we were doing the shoot were very nice, and it’s for a good cause; it’s simply that there was a breakdown in communication as to what both sides needed, the time frame, etc. We got through it, we laughed a lot, and the photos are going to look good. I’m glad we had the actors and crew we had on it – I can think of both actors and crew from other shows on which I’ve worked that would have made it a nightmare. But we all had a sense of humor about it.

Hey, Jackie Kessler – the only mirror we had for the entire, six-person, in-costume photo shoot was the “Love Your Inner Demon” mirror you sent me when your last book came out. The purse-sized one. Thank goodness I always carry it with me!

Two Photo Shoots from Hell in one week. That’s a record for me.

We went to dinner at an excellent new Thai place on W. 49th St. The owner and chef hangs out in the front, you place your order, and she goes back inside and cooks it up. Everything’s fresh and delicious, and it’s very reasonably priced.

I agreed to work a show Saturday night, right before I leave for the Cape. Am I crazy? Yes, that was a rhetorical question.

Got home at midnight, checked the email and got my good news on the novella and the play. Now I’m going to have to come up with promotional “stuff” once we get a release date set. You guys will all have to help me with the marketing campaign!

Errands to run this morning, putting together the birthday present for one of my actors, then I have to finish the pre-Belmont article and work on the anthology story. Bet you dollars to doughnuts I’ll hit the “send” button tomorrow moments before I leave for the show.

Sigh.

I’m also meeting with a journalist – I’m the one being interviewed this time – and the Cable Guy is supposed to turn up to install everything so I get my channels back. I mean, please, they took away Sci-Fi and A&E – how’s a girl supposed to get by?

Devon

Devon’s Bookstore:


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

Published in: on May 30, 2008 at 8:03 am  Comments (13)  
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Article on Freelance Rates

I’ve got an article on “Holding the Line on Rates” during the recession over on The Scruffy Dog Review blog.

Regular “Ink” post below.

Published in: on May 29, 2008 at 6:40 am  Comments Off on Article on Freelance Rates  

Thursday, May 29, 2008

Thursday, May 29, 2008
Waning Moon
Pluto Retrograde
Jupiter Retrograde
Sunny and warm

I’ve never been good at waiting. Patience is not one of my virtues. I can be patient with a rescued animal, trying to gain its trust; I can be patient getting to know a horse. But people? Not so much.

The contract requests are in to the publisher. They’re small tweaks, but very important to me, and we’ll see if they’re accepted. They both deal with contexts of my work beyond any single piece, which is why I keep them consistent from contract to contract, no matter which publisher is involved.

Still waiting to hear back from the producer – which is fine. For crying out loud, it takes more than a day to make a decision. But I don’t want to work on FEMME FATALE or SIDEKICK until I know I’m going in the right direction with tone, style, content, etc. with MATILDA MURDERS.

Still trying to figure out how to structure the next sequence of scenes on the adaptation, and didn’t get anywhere near enough work done on the anthology story. Yesterday wound up being more about admin work than creative work, which is a little frustrating, but it was necessary.

I’m out of the house today by ten a.m. and not home until midnight. I got called in for another photo call for the show, and then, well, there’s the show!

I started the pre-Belmont article, which I’ll finish tomorrow and get out.

The listings on the job boards have been frustrating: either the pay is insulting or the topics are out of my range of . . . let’s say, willingness to work. I wouldn’t be good writing about real estate because I have such a low opinion of most of the people I’ve met in the real estate and development business. So I stay away from those listings. And listings that are vague or don’t list payment – usually they’re by those site owners who want a slew of articles per week for a pittance – again, not worth my time.

I better get cracking on those brochures. I’ve been putting together a list of prospective clients, and a new brochure and another print run of snappy business cards will be a step in the right direction.

I’m out the door – have a good one.

Devon

Devon’s Bookstore:


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

Published in: on May 29, 2008 at 6:08 am  Comments (7)  
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Wednesday, May 28, 2008

Wednesday, May 28, 2008
Waning Moon
Pluto Retrograde
Jupiter Retrograde
Sunny and warm

So, before I left for the photo call at 11 AM yesterday, I’d worked on the adaptation, done another polish on THE MATILDA MURDERS, prepared it and the cover letter, sent it off, typed off my notes for Confidential Job #2, sent if off with invoice, and repacked my set bag for the photo shoot.

Pant, pant, pant. I’d put in a day’s work before I even got started with the “official” day’s work!

Train was late – as usual – but I’d left for an early enough train to take that into consideration. Got to the theatre, we waited for the car service, we packed the car – the driver couldn’t figure out how to get the ironing boarding the back – what, does Momma still do the shirts? Anyway, we got down to Chelsea without a problem. The studio was hot and stuffy, but we managed. We were prepped lickety split and the shoot started. A few minor glitches (okay, I pitched a fit at one point when it was necessary and stopped the shoot to make an adjustment on a costume – Topstick is the BEST invention known to man – or woman).

After the shoot, there was a point where I had the large garment bag of costumes slung over one arm and I’m carrying the ironing board, standing on the curb on W. 23 St. of New York City as my colleague’s hailing a cab, and one of the actors and I just looked at each other and started laughing. Welcome to my world!

Got back to the theatre (after wrestling the ironing board into the trunk of a yellow cab), redistributed everything to be prepped for the show, and I grabbed a salad for dinner.

Show was fine – I was with the women this evening rather than the men, but got confused at two points and thought I missed cues, but they were from the other track. Everything was fine. Nothing got missed, nobody died, show was fine, so it’s all good. It’s a really good group of people on the show, and that always makes it pleasant.

Got home late, checked email. Peter Bowerman’s using a quote from me on “Aggravation Fees” in his next WELL-FED WRITER newsletter. Confidential Job #2 already paid me for the work I sent in yesterday morning. And a publisher gave me an offer for HEX BREAKER. I’m going to go over the contract again – the first pass looked pretty sane. And I’ll have the lawyer look at it. I’ll let you know when all i’s are dotted and t’s are crossed. But it looks as though HEX BREAKER found a home.

I have to take a few days and think things through before doing more work on the adaptation. I’m at a critical series of scenes – it’s the big confrontation between the female protagonist and the antagonist, where the male protagonist learns the complicated history and why there’s a confrontation. If it seems early in the book for this to happen, well, when I flesh out some of the earlier scenes, it’ll be about 10-20K later in the book, I think, and then there’s a twist later on (that’s not in the screenplay, by the way) that will make sense for it to happen here.

However, I’ve been splitting action between the several factions of the protagonist group. Here, I’m not sure if I should have this action unbroken, or go back to what’s happening simultaneously, and then come back to this action for the big finale of the section. I’m worried that using a technique similar to cross-cutting in film will dilute the action and power in this scene; at the same time, I don’t want the reader to lose the sense of what else is going on in the story.

I need to focus on the anthology story today – I’m way behind on it and it’s due, well, on Friday. And I have shows tomorrow and Friday, so I better get to it. Plus, I have to write the pre-Belmont article on Friday. And a few letters and get a monologue drafted.

I’m waiting a few days to start FEMME FATALE and SIDEKICK; I want to see what the response to THE MATILDA MURDERS is first.

I hope to get a draft of the next ebook done next week, too, along with the new brochures.

I’m getting everything sorted out with Cablevision. Someone from the executive office is going to send someone to install it all – at no charge, unlike what I was told initially – which will negate the need for UPS, who can’t be bothered to deliver here anyway.

Oh, yeah, and even though I’m not leaving for the Cape until Sunday – I’m packed.

Devon

Devon’s Bookstore:


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

Published in: on May 28, 2008 at 8:34 am  Comments (4)  

Tuesday, May 27, 2008

Tuesday, May 27, 2008
Waning Moon
Pluto Retrograde
Jupiter Retrograde
Rainy and mild

So, did you have a good weekend? Are you ready for SUMMER?

I have links and things for you, so click to your heart’s content.

It’s time to catch up with my articles:

“The Misbehaving Character” in the current issue of VISION. I quote authors Colin Galbraith, Jenny Gardiner, and Jackie Kessler on how they handle characters that just won’t do what’s planned.

“Preakness Phenom”, up on FEMMEFAN, is my post-Preakness wrap-up, here.

In the same issue of FEMMEFAN, I have an article with suggestions on how to make racing safer.

In case you missed it, my Kentucky Derby wrap-up, “Run for the Roses: Triumph and Pain Intermixed” is here.

Got that?

Good.

On top of that, have you ever visited NASA’s website? It’s really cool. I hopped on because I’m interested in the Mars Phoenix Project. I didn’t realize how many concurrent projects are running at NASA right now. For some reason, I thought they’d lost all their funding and only the space shuttle stuff was going on. I was wrong, to say the least. Check it out if you get a chance.

And, continuing with Memorial Day honors, have you ever heard of The Arlington Ladies? They attend EVERY funeral at Arlington National Cemetery. They are a dedicated and amazing group of women.

Yesterday was pretty productive. Did a couple of drafts/polishes on THE MATILDA MURDERS, and went from feeling insecure about it to feeling pretty good. I’m taking another look at it this morning and off it goes. Read the material for Confidential Job #2 and took notes; will type and send them this morning. Didn’t get enough work done on the anthology story, but will drag it around with me today. Got out a few submissions.

Good morning’s work on the adaptation. I’m in the middle of a very complicated sequence right now.

I’m away from writing most of the day, because I was called in to work a photo call and then I have a show tonight.

So visit the links above and enjoy!

Devon

Adaptation: 45,176 words out of est. 90,000

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
45 / 90
(50.0%)

Devon’s Bookstore:


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

Published in: on May 27, 2008 at 7:26 am  Comments (4)  
Tags: , ,

Monday, May 26, 2008

Monday, May 26, 2008
Waning Moon
Pluto Retrograde
Jupiter Retrograde
Memorial Day
Sunny and warm

I like to take a moment to pause in thanks for all those who died fighting for the country in which they believed.

Yesterday was a good day; I worked on THE MATILDA MURDERS. I worked on the short story. I went to CT to visit a friend, and we had lobster, potato salad, and champagne to celebrate the holiday. I spent a good portion of the afternoon reading and dozing in the sun.

Came home, did more work on the MATILDA MURDERS. I’m going to give it a polish today and off it goes tomorrow. And then I’ll start on FEMME FATALE and SIDEKICK.

Got a nice chunk done on the adaptation this morning. I’m hitting the point where I’m digressing quite a bit from the screenplay; not only am I enriching the story, I need a different way to the ending for the book than I did in the screenplay. The screenplay needs to tell the story as compactly as possible; the novel is going to tell it more expansively, in a more detailed fashion, and is actually more politically and socially complex. It’s not a bad thing, it just has to be handled differently.

I want to spend a bit of time outside today, because it’s so beautiful, but I need to turn around a critique for LA, polish MATILDA, and, hopefully, get a first draft of the Crone story done so I can polish it and get it out by Wednesday.

It’s been heaven not having workmen causing havoc in the building for the past few days. Just heaven. But, to me, it smells like there’s a problem with the boiler. No one wants to hear it, so I think I’m going to get a carbon monoxide detector and install it. I’m not willing to put us all at risk because no one wants to deal with the problem.

It feels great to get in a few really solid writing days. This week will be fragmented because of shows and preparing to leave for the Cape. So I’m trying to front-load as much as I can and be very, very organized.

Devon

Adaptation: 43,430 words out of est. 90,000

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
43 / 90
(47.8%)

Devon’s Bookstore:


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

Published in: on May 26, 2008 at 8:09 am  Comments (3)  
Tags: ,

Sunday, May 25, 2008

Sunday, May 25, 2008
Waning Moon
Pluto Retrograde
Saturn Retrograde
Sunny and lovely

I had a really quiet day for the most part, yesterday. I felt better in the evening, so that’s when I got back to the page, and worked. I have another couple of scenes on THE MATILDA MURDERS, and then I’ll do a polish tonight and send it off tomorrow. I still have to do the FEMME FATALE and SIDEKICK scripts, but I hope to get those finished either before I go to the Cape or just after I get back next week.

I did a little bit of work on the short stories, but, once I finish the MATILDA scenes, there’s one story in particular, the Crone story, that needs my primary attention.

There’s actually a post up on The Tactile Muse, which goes into detail about how I spent my afternoon yesterday when I should have been writing.

I’m trying to get everything done early this morning, because I’m spending most of the day at my friend’s place in CT. After all, it’s a holiday weekend – I want to sit outside and enjoy it!

I’m taking work with me – both Confidential Job #1 and #2 sent me new assignments, and I want to get everything done this week before I leave for the Cape. I’m still at my old rate with #1, until June 15, so I’m trying to get as much done before the rate change as possible. And, if the new rate doesn’t work for me . . .I’ll have to leave. I’ll give it a few months to see how it shakes out – more frequent and easier assignments at the lower rate can work in my favor. Ones that require a higher level of skill and concentration, and I’ll have to make the decision that’s best for me.

Hope you’re all having a fun and creative holiday weekend!

Devon

PS I have links to a bunch of articles of mine that are up — but I’ll post them on Tuesday, when people are actually around to read them!

Published in: on May 25, 2008 at 7:39 am  Comments (1)  
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Saturday, May 24, 2008

Saturday, May 24, 2008
Waning Moon
Pluto Retrograde
Jupiter Retrograde
Sunny and beautiful

Not much to say. I’m doing a quiet and, hopefully, productive day writing at home. The computer continues to limp along. I bought a bunch of flash drives and have been backing up like crazy, which loses a lot of writing time. Unfortunately, there’s no full-system back-up on this machine – only a “restore” not a “backup and restore”. I’m wondering if it was mis-loaded when Geek squad “fixed” my machine a year or so ago. So the process of backing everything up is much slower and more labor intensive than it needs to be.

Getting into the city wasn’t as hateful as usual yesterday, because so many people fled early for the holiday weekend. It’s fleet week, so there are thousands of excited and confused sailors and Marines walking around – always fun. They love being in New York and New Yorkers love hosting them. I helped one group of very young sailors who were about twenty blocks lost and going in the entirely wrong direction; I helped another pair of Marines who were lost, but didn’t want to admit it; and talked to some older sailors who were very excited by the tour of the NBC studios.

The show was fine; one guy was out with an injury; a new lead started; they were all tired from the afternoon rehearsal. But they’re a bunch of really good people, so everyone pulls together and has fun.

Home around midnight, up early, not feeling great. Had to run some errands early in the morning; have more to do now and then it’s writing. I’ve got a script to finish and polish today, two more to start, and two short stories to finish this weekend. I also got an idea – a new character started talking in my head and won’t shut up.

Hopefully, it’ll be quiet around here and I can get a lot done.

I’d really like a nap, but maybe that will be my reward for a few hours’ worth of steady writing.

Have a great holiday!

Devon

Published in: on May 24, 2008 at 8:18 am  Comments (2)  
Tags: , , ,

Friday, May 23, 2008

Friday, May 23, 2008
Waning Moon
Pluto Retrograde
Jupiter Retrograde
Sunny and pleasant

Yesterday was one of those days you have when you’re dealing with an illness where you have to feel worse before you get better. Oh, well, but ick. I’m feeling better today, thank goodness, but the early part of yesterday was not fun.

I got some errands done. More building crap – gee, what else is new?

I’ve got most of my ducks in a row for the trip to Cape Cod in just over a week, so that’s a good thing. I’d pack – you know me, I like to pack at least a week before I leave – but, if the weather’s nice, I’m only wearing dresses, and I don’t want them squashed in the bag for a week, so I guess I’m just going to have to pack (oh, horrors) the night before.

I’ll make sure the writing bag is ready early, though.

Colin Galbraith posted an interesting dilemma on his blog, stating his decision to put aside a WIP because he didn’t feel the story had anything to say. I feel like that every time I go to a PEN event – here are all these Serious Literary Writers who are changing the world, and what the heck am I doing?

Telling stories. My characters want their stories told. I have to tell them, or I don’t get any peace, they’re yammering so much in my head; and I often don’t know what the themes are in the work, “what I’m saying”, until after the first draft is done. What I think I’m writing about and what is actually underneath the actions are often two different things.

So I try not to worry, at least in early drafts, and see what I have, what the characters have to say, what growth arcs are happening, before I try to impose the rest of it.

The adaptation shocked me the other day, because I realized that, while I thought it was “about” one thing, it’s really about something entirely different, and, although it’s set in a different world, many of the same decisions/situations/dilemmas face the characters as we are now facing. That wasn’t my intent when I started – in fact, had I begun Script Frenzy with that intent, I would have scared myself off and never gotten more than a page or two into it.

I lost almost my entire writing day because I had to back up files – including system files – in case my hard drive decides to die. Yes, Melissa, it’s time to go Mac, I am desperate to go Mac, but the outlay of cash is more than I can handle right now.

I like all the bits of my computer, so, in spite of the fact that Dell’s response to my question is, “We don’t have that information; you have to buy a new system” – again, more coercion – when I tried to get information about replacing just the hard drive – I’m talking to other people, and that may be what I do. Why not replace the hard drive and reload all my programs/systems for $150 or so rather than spending $600-800 on another crappy PC system that will only work well for the first month? I’m perfectly happy with the monitor and speakers and keyboard and all the rest. Why not just replace what’s bad and keep this system limping along until I can afford to do the total replacement that I want?

So, I’m annoyed that I’m losing days when I’m on such tight deadlines, but I’ve got to make sure these systems are backed up (time to by more CDs) before it gives up the ghost for good, and I’m asking around as to what kind of hard drive I can buy to put in here and then I’ll pay someone who knows what they’re doing to put it in. And I can reload the programs myself – I’m going through all my disks to make sure I have them, and anything I’m not sure about, I’m backing up again.

Frustrating.

Traveling in and out of the city was annoying, as usual. Too many people in too small a space, and the trains, as usual, running badly. I had quite the encounter with a SFT. She was crossing the street in the opposite direction, with plenty of room, but tried to shove me and said, “ExCUSE me. You need to move.”

Yeah, I’ve got the bumper of a yellow cab at my hip and you’ve got all of W.49th Street, bitch. But I said, “I’m the resident; you’re the Stupid Fucking Tourist; you move.”

“I pay your salary!” she screeched.

“YOU pay me shit,” I replied. “You’re here because I wrote something so fascinating that coming to NYC was suddenly the most important thing in your life.”

I meant as a copywriter, but she was too stupid to understand. Her eyes got very round. “Ooooh, are you FAMOUS?” she asked.

“You’ll never know, will you?” I retorted, and walked off, leaving her in the middle of the street making fish faces.

Maybe that’s the way most B’way workers get through the day, saying oh, well, the tourists are paying my salary, I’ll deal with their rudeness. But the SFT’s do NOT pay mine.

Grabbed an iced coffee at Thalia (which I promptly spilled down my shirt because the lid wasn’t on properly – oh, well, dark colored shirt, easily washed). Show was fun. I’m dressing the men, and they’re lots of fun. Caught up on all the backstage stories from the other shows, including the stories about the Major Television Personality who was recently brought into a show to boost ticket sales, and not only hasn’t that happened, he’s stupid AND clueless. At least if you’re clueless, be nice. Well, that’s what the producers get when they go for name instead of talent. I feel for the people working on the show every day, but I don’t have much sympathy for those producers.

Whatever.

Got home around midnight, puttered around. Got up at my usual 6:30 this morning, coaxed the computer up, did some work on the adaptation. I have to really push on the script today. Another short writing day, because I have a show tonight, and then the weekend has to be all about writing.

Keep your fingers crossed that this hard drive can last another week so I can back everything up, meet my deadlines, get a new hard drive, and then drop it off to be fixed before I leave on my trip.

Devon

Adaptation: 41,322 words out of est. 90,000

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
41 / 90
(45.6%)

Devon’s Bookstore:


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

Published in: on May 23, 2008 at 7:24 am  Comments (4)  
Tags: , , , , ,

Thursday, May 22, 2008

Thursday, May 22, 2208
Waning Moon
Pluto Retrograde
Jupiter Retrograde
Rainy and cool

I didn’t blog yesterday. Oops. Well, there was plenty of read from the blog the day before to keep you occupied, right?

I didn’t get as much done as I needed to on Tuesday (familiar refrain) and I was pushed to get my deadlined work done Wednesday morning before I left for acupuncture. I managed to get out some job pitches as well, but I’d say about 80% of the listings now are just plain insulting. I’m not going to write a press release for 1/10 of my regular rate. It’s not worth my time, and it’s certainly not worth the ink.

Which is good incentive to get the new brochure done and start creating a place for myself with companies for whom I want to work.

It was a rainy, miserable day; I was sore and achy, so I wasn’t my most productive self.

Plus, I’m thoroughly pissed at both Cablevision and UPS. Cablevision forced me to change my service package, because they planned to strip the channels I watch from the one I have. I have to get a box now. I was given a guaranteed arrival by Monday, via UPS. It’s now Thursday. No box. I expect it from UPS, because they’re completely incompetent. I expect Cablevision to honor their contract.

And, of course, more building crap. The new super seems to only be rude to women. Imagine that. Imagine how far that goes with me. I won’t tolerate it, and I made it clear to the management company that I won’t. I have no doubt there will be reprisals from this guy.

Drive to Long Island was good. It’s pretty sad when finding a station selling gas for $4.09/gallon is cause for celebration. Acupuncture was good, in that it made me feel better, but my acupuncturist found something wrong that’s been triggered by stress (gee, you think?) that we need to take care of right away to keep it from turning into something serious. So, I’m putting together some herbal concoctions and adding certain foods to my diet to counterbalance – it’s interesting, because it’s exactly the foods for which I’ve had unusual cravings over the past few days.

I’m working on my deadlined material, and I’m behind. It’s taking longer to get it out of my brain and onto the page than I would like, but it’s getting there.

Had cocktails and snacks with a friend last night to catch up. We’re going away on alternate weeks, so this was our time to catch up, switch keys, etc. She’s going to a house party on Martha’s Vineyard this week for the coming week – so I lent her a yoga book and A DOG’S BREAKFAST DVD for them all to watch. It’s the type of witty, charming movie they’d all enjoy.

I’m putting my head down and working as hard as I can this morning, because I have to go in to the city and work a show tonight.

Got some good work done on the adaptation these past few days. In the next draft, I’m going to have to go back and rework some of the fight sequences – I’m not happy with them. For now, they’re more placeholders than legitimate scenes. I know they have to be there, but I don’t feel like choreographing them, so I’m setting in a few paragraphs so I know they’re there, and then, in the second draft – which is my draft to over-write anyway – I’ll figure them out in detail.

Then, last night, I was trying to work when the computer completely freaked out and I got a message saying there was no hard drive. Huh? I’m looking at it. Turned the machine on and off five or six times. It swore there was no hard drive in existence.

Unplugged everything, took it apart, took apart what was inside what I took apart, put it back together (yeah, like I understood ANYTHING of what I was doing, but I figured I couldn’t make it much worse), plugged everything back in, and it’s limping along. It’s not running well, but it’s running.

Sigh.

Let me repeat: Microsoft sucks and it’s built to fail. Hate that.

Got to get a lot of work done this morning.

Devon

Adaptation: 40,411 words out of est. 90,000

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
40 / 90
(44.4%)

Devon’s Bookstore:


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

Published in: on May 22, 2008 at 7:40 am  Comments (5)  
Tags: , , , , , ,

Tuesday, May 20, 2008

Tuesday, May 20, 2008
Waning Moon
Pluto Retrograde
Jupiter Retrograde
Rainy and mild

My head is so stuffed full of information, it’s ready to burst. It was a good day, but a long one.

Train ride in was mediocre, as usual. I couldn’t stand the thought of being underground, so I decided to take the bus up Madison Avenue and then across 79th St. to the west side. The bus ride up Madison was excruciatingly slow, because there was a water main break at 57th St. The ride across the park was fine, except for the bratty, spoiled little rich kids with their nannies on the bus. One, in particular, a little girl of about six, was exceptionally horrid. Tantrums, screaming, whining, hitting other kids, trying to hit adults. She didn’t try it with me – like most bullies, she’s a coward at heart. I glared at her once and she hid behind the nanny. I’m not one for hitting a kid very often, but this one needed a good smack. Actually, maybe if they started by telling her “no” occasionally – and meaning it – it would make a difference. If she’s like this at six, what will she be like as a teenager, or as an adult? It’s a shame, because she’s very pretty. Too bad the inside doesn’t match the outside.

The Museum of Natural History was full of kids. I forgot that this is the time of year for school trips. You can tell the city kids from the suburban kids. The city kids are loud and rambunctious, but, living in the city, they’re very aware of personal space. They invade their friends’ space, but they’re careful not to invade that of strangers. The suburban kids have the same unwarranted sense of entitlement that their parents do, and just don’t care.

There was a really cute little boy of about eight with his dad, who thought EVERYTHING was AMAZING. There was a little girl of about eight or nine making sure her younger brothers and sisters didn’t wander off – there were about five in that group. The youngest could barely walk, but liked all the animals. She’d (Eldest) read a bunch of books before coming to the museum and was telling them stories about everything – it was great. A teacher-in-the-making (and most of it was even right). There was a girl of about eleven or twelve sketching, photographing, taking lots of notes in the Northwest Coastal Indians exhibit. Either she had a paper to write, or she’s an archaeologist-in-the-making. One little kid fell asleep in a corner of the Hall of Gems – it’s dark and only the cases with the gems are lit. There was a group of teenage boys wandering through North American Mammals, singing Pat Benatar lyrics. I told them I was impressed that they knew the lyrics to her songs, and they all blushed.

The Museum has a lot of stuff for kids, and several of the shops are geared specifically towards kids, filled with learning toys and books – really, they have one of the best shops I’ve ever seen. Low on the kitschy souvenirs, high on the education-presented-engagingly.

I wandered through the special floor of the main store dedicated to books. I could have easily dropped nine or ten THOUSAND dollars just in that bookstore. Fabulous stuff.

I visited some of my favorites – the Blue Whale, the African elephants, the owls, the biodiversity exhibit. I spent more time in the Human Evolution exhibit than I planned, because they were explaining archaeological and anthropological methods and evaluations, and I figured that would be good for the Gwen/Justin books. Yes, I eavesdropped, but the (very cute) lecturer didn’t seem to mind.

I spent quite awhile in the biodiversity exhibit, refreshing my memory. It’s a great exhibit, but once you’ve spent time in a real rain forest (I went to one in Australia), nothing else quite compares. You can recreate the look of it, but not the energy flow.

I spent a lot of time in the Halls of Minerals and Gems. It’s one of my favorite places. It’s very soothing to sit amongst enormous chunks of amethyst and crystal. Because of the dramatic lighting and carpeting, when it’s not full of rambunctious kids, it’s a great place to simply sit and be quiet. It’s a very meditative space.

The Hall of Meteorites is always fascinating. And I spent a lot of time in the Rose Center for Earth and Space. Honestly, I liked it better when it was the Hayden Planetarium. This has more levels and more open space, but I felt there was more concentrated information in the former, and it wasn’t all focused on making you buy an extra ticket for the Space show or the IMAX show. I took a lot of notes on the information that was there, and the Planetarium shop is terrific. I jotted down many titles, but I bought three books: Miss Leavitt’s Stars by George Johnson, about the woman who figured out how to measure distances between stars and galaxies. I’d never heard of her before; have you? I also bought a very basic book on the Solar System, because I haven’t read anything about it since about the fourth grade, and, other than being able to recite the planets in order from the sun and know what the retrogrades mean . . .that’s all I know. There was also a book on the sale table that I scooped up called A Traveler’s Guide to Mars by William K. Hartmann. The more I read about Mars, the more I think it was once fairly similar to Earth and that civilization destroyed the planet much as we are destroying this one. Flipping through the book, it seems that some of my theories are laid out and backed up in the book, but some of the things I think are possible are discounted, so I’m interested to read it and learn. It’s over 400 pages, so it will be quite a read. I also jotted down a bunch of titles that I’m going to try to get elsewhere.

On the spur of the moment, I decided to go up to the dinosaur exhibits. I’d always loved them as a kid (if I hadn’t gone into the arts, I would probably have been an archaeologist). I’d wafted through briefly after it was re-conceived, but hadn’t spent any time there. This time, I did.

Wow.

The curators truly did a spectacular job. One of the things I loved was how graceful the skeletons looked. That sounds weird, since they were these huge, lumbering beasts, or these delicate raptor-type things, but the way the spines curved and the tails stretched and the angle of the heads and front arms – really beautiful. I took a lot of photographs and wrote a lot of notes (so I’ll know what the photographs represent). This will help me in the evolution of world-building, as will the biodiversity exhibit and the Space Center exhibit.

I probably gathered information for about a dozen projects here; it’s information I can use on projects in progress, and information I can continue using in the future. I think I’m going to get some children’s books on the basics of stars and their physiology (when in doubt, get it in children’s book format – they often have terrific information stated engagingly). I still might contact some of the staff at the museum with questions, but I want to see if I can answer them on my own first.

That was the bulk of the day. I wandered down Central Park West and over towards Lincoln Center. I browsed in the big Barnes & Noble there – since when did it become a pickup joint along the lines of San Francisco’s Marina Safeway of the 1980’s? At first I thought I was delusional, but after the sixth guy asked me for my phone number . . .

My friend and I were supposed to meet at a place on Columbus Avenue, but Fordham University had its graduation ceremony and the place was packed. So I grabbed a few bar stools over at Josefina’s on Broadway instead, and that’s where we met. It’s a place for grown-ups and was a much-needed respite. We had an elegant glass of wine and caught up on life, then maneuvered through the renovations at Lincoln Center to the Walter Reade Theatre for the PEN Literary Awards.

What a beautiful evening! Low key but elegant and friendly. Jonathan Ames was the host. I’ve never read anything of his, but after listening to him up there last night, I am going to! If he writes anywhere near as wonderfully as he speaks, he’ll become one of my favorite aauthors. The ceremony was lovely, simple, from the heart, and inspiring. Richard Nelson received a lifetime achievement for his plays – one of my favorite playwrights, by the way. Janet Malcolm, whose work I thoroughly admire, received an award for her biography of Gertrude Stein and Alice Toklas (if you haven’t read Malcolm’s work on Sylvia Plath – read it. Now.). Cynthia Ozick received the Nabokov award. There were awards for translation and a children’s book-in-progress, and first novels and poetry and all sorts of inspiring stuff. Truly lovely. And there was an empty chair to signify the writers we work so hard to release via the Core Freedoms/Freedom to Write program who are imprisoned throughout the work for speaking their truths.

The reception after was lovely. Whoever does the catering for PEN always does a terrific job. The h’ors d’oeuvres are just the right size, not too messy, and tasty. My favorites were the sesame rounds with guacamole and the farmstead cheese with pear drizzled with lavender honey.

The only unfortunate part of the day was how badly my feet hurt. I was dressed up, yes, and on my feet all day. But I wore one of my most comfortable pairs of boots. Yet, by the time I got home, after 11 PM, I could barely limp. I couldn’t believe it. And I realized – I’m not used to wearing shoes – at all – any more.

I work at home. We have a no-shoes-in-the-house rule. I put on a pair of shoes to go to the store or out to dinner, but that’s maybe a couple of hours. I wear my Timberland sneakers to do shows. But, other than that, I don’t wear shoes. I buy them. They’re on my shoe rack looking cute. But I spent most of my time barefoot.

Shoes hurt. My feet get claustrophobic.

Actually, my feet hurt, my ankles hurt, my shins hurt, my knees hurt, my back hurt, and my neck hurt by the time I got home, and I’m not feeling so perky today (damn alignment)!

Fortunately, I have acupuncture tomorrow.

I have to have an organized writing day. On the train, I figured out the final obstacle for THE MATILDA MURDERS, so I hope I can finish it today. And I got some interesting ideas for the adaptation, and want to do some work on the two stories.

I should probably also pitch for more short-term paying work.

Devon

Devon’s Bookstore:


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

Monday, May 19, 2008

Monday, May 19, 2008
Full Moon
Pluto Retrograde
Jupiter Retrograde
Sunny and cool

I had such a hard time getting going on Friday. The weather was miserable, and I dreaded Preakness weekend. This is unusual, because Preakness weekend is usually the wackiest and most fun of the three Triple Crown weekends. I guess part of me was filled with the dread that more horses could break down.

I putzed around, I had trouble getting things off on time, I was hours and hours and hours late getting out of the apartment, the weather was awful, the roads were terrible, and I just kind of holed up all Friday night.

The good part is that I read the ARC of Yasmine Galenorn’s upcoming novel DRAGON WYTCH. I enjoyed it, and it has some interesting surprises in it. I’ll review it on A Biblio Paradise on Friday, June 13.

And I got a lot of writing done. I got some solid work done on the adaptation-which-will-someday-have-a-name, a short story that came out of nowhere, the anthology short, and THE MATILDA MURDERS. I’m getting into some very interesting territory in the adaptation, where some of our protagonists discover that, just because they’re on different sides from the antagonists, it doesn’t mean the rank and file of “the other side” are all evil. And THE MATILDA MURDERS is coming along well. The characters are surprising me in a good way. Hope the producer feels the same! The story that came out of nowhere is kind of a departure for me, and I’m having an interesting (in a good way) time of it; the anthology story will make some people uncomfortable, but . . .too bad. Saturday morning was sunny, and I dragged my feet about starting race coverage to write outside in the sunshine on other projects for a few hours, which was great.

The race day was better than I expected, although I hadn’t been particularly impressed with the card. A friend of mine trained a horse who had a big win in the tenth race, and I was thrilled for him. And I got to catch up with some other friends, and talk to other people and see some horses that are under the big radar but still worth watching.

Big Brown just blew everyone away in the Preakness. One of the things that struck me about the horse, especially that day, was how smart he is. And how playful. He’s got a great sense of humor. And yet, when it’s time to race, he’s all business. I’m impressed with his learning curve from race to race. Some horses need multiple races to understand what’s expected. He really processes what he’s done and what happens around him and applies it to the next race in a very logical fashion that I think is pretty rare in a horse. He listens, he trusts the humans around him, and he puts it all together. Once he made his move on Saturday, that was just it.

If Casino Drive runs in the Belmont, I think that will be his toughest competition. He’s going to have to run the race of the century so far, because Casino Drive is tough as well as talented. And he shares a mother with Rags to Riches and Jazil, previous Belmont winners. The mare Better Than Honor’s giving us a better line of horses than most of the highly-regarded sires.

I was also really pleased by my long shot pick, Ichabad Crane. I thought he’d make the show spot, and that’s exactly what he did. He was pretty much ignored, and he just did his thing and kind of ignored everything going on around him.

I wrote and sent off two articles Sunday morning: the owed Preakness wrap-up (just over 2K)and my ideas on some of the implementations to create better safety for horses and jockeys (about 1200 words). Those should go up later this week. Some of the issues that feed into the bigger overall safety issue are being ignored as the industry tries to soothe the upset that Eight Belles’s death caused. Don’t try to placate . . .DO something. I should probably be less cynical about the NTRA than I am, but until I see definitive action, I will continue my skepticism.

The weather was vile yesterday, too. Ick.

I managed to stop at my friend’s place on the way home and do four loads of laundry (much needed and no, I didn’t haul it around in my car all weekend, I stopped home to get it). The cats were cranky, poor things, and I just pushed to do as much writing as possible.

I decided that J-WAT (the July writing marathon) is a good time to get started on THE BALTHAZAAR TREASURE, the second Gwen/Justin book. I should have the research completed by then.

I’m getting my ducks in a row for my next foray into Massachusetts, and I’m trying to get ahead of deadlines so that nothing hangs over me when I have to go out of town, or when I have a show day. My dear writer pal Lori prefers to have deadlines waiting when she returns – I need to have it clear before I leave, or I fret the entire time I’m gone. Because if you assume there’s time to do it when you get back, the Universe will make sure to bite you in the butt! Or is it just me?

I need to get out of my own way on one project in particular. I’m being silly about it – I’m perfectly capable of doing good work, but, for some reason, seem to have lost my confidence for it.

Today, I’m out for most of the day. I’m at the Museum of Natural History all day for research, meeting a friend for cocktails, and then attending the PEN Literary Awards at Lincoln Center. Something a little different – I’m thoroughly looking forward to it.

Hope your week has a terrific start!

Devon

Adaptation: 37,802 words out of est. 90,000

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
37 / 90
(41.1%)

Devon’s Bookstore:


5 in 10: Create 5 Short Stories in Ten Weeks
by Devon Ellington. This ebooklet takes you from inspiration to writing to revision to marketing. By the end of ten weeks, you will have either 5 short stories or a good chunk of a novella complete. And it’s only 50 cents, USD. Here.

Writing Rituals: Ideas to Support Creativity by Cerridwen Iris Shea. This ebooklet contains several rituals to help you start writing, get you through writer’s block, and help send your work on its way. It’s only 39 cents USD. (Note: Cerridwen Iris Shea is one of the six names under which I publish). Here.


Full Circle: An Ars Concordia Anthology
. Edited by Colin Galbraith. This is a collection of short stories, poems, and other pieces by a writers’ group of which I am a member. My story is “Pauvre Bob”, set at Arlington Race Track in Illinois. You can download it free here:

Published in: on May 19, 2008 at 7:23 am  Comments (7)  
Tags: , , , , ,